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Where you teaching in 1986 ?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by iamagoodgirl, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. If so, what did you earn (take home pay) ?
     
  2. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    I'd just started - £7000 I think. But that's from memory. Not my greatest asset.
     
  3. manic28

    manic28 New commenter

    Were?
     
  4. Sept. 1988 I started on £8,880!!
     
  5. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    In 1987 I was earning £10,000 but I was paying £255 a month on the mortgage on my first house. I had a car as there was no other viable way to get to work. I was a single parent and had to budget really hard barely breaking even at the end of each month. I DID break even though because I had no luxuries, made my own clothes or got them from bargain bins, ate frugally and if I went anywhere had to consider the cost of the petrol seriously. As others have said, people who assume it was easier then have to consider the higher interest rates.
     
  6. In 1986 I was earning about £5000 working full time as an Executive Officer in the Civil Service. My husband at the time was earning £6500 as a computer programmer. We bought our first house - a brand new 2 bedroom for £39500 and were seriously broke! As others have said, interest rates were high and rose rapidly over the next few years to around 15%. Then there was the introduction of poll tax! I even got a part time job as an evening supervisor in our local shop to try to make ends meet at one point. I used to leave my full time job at 5.30, start work at the shop at 6pm and work through to 10pm. My husband did likewise working in a bar!
    That said, when I left the Civil Service to go into teaching, I took a big drop in pay as an NQT, so we weren't badly paid back then. There was also MIRAS (Mortgage Interest Relief At Source) which we got then but don't now. Also married couples used to get tax relief I'm sure.
    I certainly wouldn't want to go back in time!
     
  7. Yes I was teaching in 1986- having not long returned to work after the birth of son 2. Can't remember how much I was earning- but we'd moved in 1984- when I was earning around £6,500- and we'd borrowed about £85 less than the maxinmum on my wage! Our house cost £27000. I started teaching in April 1977 and my salary was £2500. I can still recall the thrill of my salary crossing the £10,000 mark (probably about 1989) but as has previously been stated interest rates in the 1980s were sky high...those were the days!!
     
  8. In 1987 i had been teaching for 11 years and was earning £9700. I bought a flat for £31000 and had to lie to say I earnt £10000 otherwise I wouldn't have got a mortgage. Interest rates even then were very high. Then prices rose a bit before the recession hit and prices plummeted again. In 1991 the same flat was worth about £28000. Not good times. Luckily I sold in 1990 and made a small profit.
     
  9. I started teaching in 1973 and my pay was £1306 pa the ex was a civil servant on a similar salary. The Houghton Report had just brought up the salaries to a reasonable level at the time, but the wicked government worked it so that existing teachers went on the new scales on the nearest higher salary to the one they were already getting. This meant that as an NQT I earned about the same as someone who had already been teaching for a couple of years!
    In those days teachers didn't get paid in August - you got a double salary in July. Having used a laundrette all year we spent this largesse on a washing machine and then lived on beans on toast in September 'cos we hadn't any money till the end of the month. We bought our first house (3 bed mid terrace in Camberley) in 1975 for £11,500 with a loan of £1000 for the deposit from my parents and a mortgage from the Teachers' Building Society which was the only Society who would consider us for the rest. I think they gave us about three times our joint income. I'll leave it to you younger ones to work out whether we were better off then.
     

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