1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Where there’s a will there’s a.............what?

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by norwichred, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    so, we leave next week.

    I’m 50, two young children, embarking on an international adventure.

    A friend of my father’s died intestate a few weeks ago and it’s causing a logistical nightmare and it looks like a pauper’s funeral.

    So it got me thinking.

    How do people arrange their wills? Do you do it in the country you’re living in? Or do you do it back in the UK (assuming you’re a UK citizen)?

    How is this handled?
     
  2. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    It depends greatly on where you are a citizen, where you will be living and where you have the misfortune of stopping living. Any of those three places can have laws about inheritance that would impact you. For example requiring that a percentage of your estate go to certain relatives (this rule can overrule a will in some countries).
    The best approach imho is to work with a company that specializes in wills for expats and knows the rules for both your country of residence and your citizenship.
    Good luck.
     
  3. 576

    576 Established commenter

    I have no dependents so don't have a will yet.
    I plan to make one next time I'm home.
    As my house is in the UK, and most of my money is in UK Bank accounts or invested off shore with a company registered in the UK and as my will will leave all this to a small UK charity that seems to make sense.
     
  4. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    You may find that you need a will which is recognized in your residence country.
     
  5. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    I spoke to some lawyers and they said that a husband's property automatically goes to his wife and vice versa, under Bulgarian law. But yes, it might be sensible to have a Will. Now that we have our 10-year BG residency, this is something we should get on with.
     
  6. taiyah

    taiyah Occasional commenter

    Whether you have large assets in your country of residence (job) + your passport country then a will is always highly advisable particularly if there are children invloved. You can write and attest your will in your country of citizenship (passport). Most countries will honour this but always check the legislation of your country of residence. It may ask you to provide both the English and the translated version, and then register (stamps etc) this through thier appropriate ministry.

    Regarding fees and lawyers drafting the will. You don't need them. You can write one yourself by hand (advisable) clearly identifying you are of both sound and rational mind and the name/s of your executor. Then get two non-beneficiaries people to witness your signature. They will also need to sign and date their name. Formal words such as bequests, gift et al you can Google. But you can use plain words such as "I give..." As for your beneficiaries, you must clearly write their full passport names, DOB and even their birth place.

    What you want to avoid is your assets, including provisions for children being handled by a State executor. This happens when you don't have a will. In most western countries the fees depends on how much your asset/s are worth and any child agencies involved. The higher the total asset the higher the % fees of the State or solicitor acting as your executor.
     
    Aim4Jannah likes this.
  7. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    To avoid a state executor you need to appoint an executor in your will. Possibly joint executors, one per country where you hold assets. And possibly backup executors in case someone can’t serve when the time comes.
    I strongly recommend a lawyer. There are so many little details that could mess up your best efforts.
     
  8. makhnovite

    makhnovite Established commenter

    Good advice all round, I am having a similar experience with my fathers will which is currently in probate, his will was with a solicitor so he is the executor and it is going smoothly but my fathers estate will have to pay for the privilege (around 3 grand!).

    None of this is helped by the fact that our current wonderful government, is using probate fees as backdoor taxation, and everything will now take twice as long and cost three or four times as much!

    Unfortunately for the op his father's friend died intestate so it will take a lot longer - it used to be 8-9 months before these changes, so who knows how long now!

    The Tory party's list of fur cups goes on and on; social care, brexit, probation service, prisons, universal credit, etc etc ad nauseum.

    Who told them that de-regulation and privatisation meant things would be run more efficiently - oh yes, I know!
     
  9. shazzamac

    shazzamac New commenter

    If you are going to Middle East then prob best to have a local will if you have kids. There, it is often not the wife who inherits as it would be in UK. And money can be spread to all sorts of relatives. If you are the husband and die, all bank accounts etc can get frozen leaving your wife and kids with nothing until it's sorted out.

    It's easy to set up a UK will for UK assets.... Even with a solicitor to do it, its just a few hundred pounds, but I first used a pack from whsmiths and when I showed it to a solicitor he said it would still stand.
    A UK will will generally not apply for assets in other countries. Our UK solicitor told us that, and it's in the will itself. It's so different everywhere in the world that you will need to state the country in your post so you can get better feedback, or do a lot of research of your own.
    Have fun in your new country.
     
  10. shazzamac

    shazzamac New commenter

    If you are going to Middle East then prob best to have a local will if you have kids. There, it is often not the wife who inherits as it would be in UK. And money can be spread to all sorts of relatives. If you are the husband and die, all bank accounts etc can get frozen leaving your wife and kids with nothing until it's sorted out.

    It's easy to set up a UK will for UK assets.... Even with a solicitor to do it, its just a few hundred pounds, but I first used a pack from whsmiths and when I showed it to a solicitor he said it would still stand.
    A UK will will generally not apply for assets in other countries. Our UK solicitor told us that, and it's in the will itself. It's so different everywhere that you will need to state the country in your post so you can get better feedback, or do a lot of research of your own.
    Have fun in your new country.
     
  11. norwichred

    norwichred Occasional commenter

    Very helpful stuff all round.

    We’re going to Kuwait.

    No assets as yet but hopefully after a year we will and then I can start putting something together.
     
  12. 576

    576 Established commenter

    But don't just think about assets.
    Think about guardianship of your children.
    If I had dependents I wouldn't put off making a will.
     
  13. miketribe

    miketribe Established commenter

    We had one drawn up by a solicitor in England and another by a notario in Spain, just to be on the safe side since we have assets in both countries.
     

Share This Page