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Where should we go?

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by ScotLass33, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. asiantiger

    asiantiger New commenter

    I was in the mountains of Yangminshan in Taiwan during Christmas and my allergy that I was suffering from in China completely disappeared due to the clean, fresh air there. Now back in China and the histamine has started once more.

    There are two teachers at my school in China whose spouses have managed to obtain work at the school. They are only paid a local Chinese salary though and their salaries are paid through their spouses as they do not have a work visa. So it is possible to work in China as a couple. It's cheap labour really for the school but this has been discussed at length on another thread. Chinese corporation-owned international schools (mine is intl not bilingual) are cutting down on costs it seems wherever they can.

    TEFL teaching is abundant in Asia not just China. Korea for example has hundreds of language schools called hakwons. Your husband could get a job at one of these without a problem with just a BA and being a native speaker. You don't have to have a TEFL to teach in Korea or China although it helps. You only really need a TEFL to teach actually in the UK or in Europe. Everywhere else it is optional unless it is say working for the British Council and then you would require one.
     
  2. asiantiger

    asiantiger New commenter

    Also in CHina and possibly elsewhere locals do not have to be a qualified teacher to teach at a school. There is some sort of teacher training in China I believe but for a Public or State school in China, you only need your degree in your subject. Some Chinese teachers are taking or have taken the PGCEi to increase their chances of getting a good job. International schools in China get round this by calling them "TAs or TTs and some Independent teachers". Of course the real reason I feel is that they want to hire cheap teachers (4000 a month RMB is what a chinese teacher gets at an intl school unless they have responsibilities and then they can get around 8k RMB as one does at my school. They are not THAT poor though since most get married to wealthier families, have their own businesses and anyway 4k for a Chinese person is OK money.) I have asked them why international schools pay the same local chinese salary as Public Schools and they told me that they are actually better off in the Public/State school system here in China as they get a lot more benefits than international schools pay them. Most of them are females anyway who marry into wealthier families and this seems to be how it's done in poor wage China (for locals not expats who have intl salaries).
     
  3. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    The issue in these situations is what will the follow on spouse be doing all day to avoid "Board Spouse Syndrome", which can break up many relationships.

    Unless your spouse is a qualified tradesman and can do a bit of electrical wiring or plumbing, there is little room for gainful employment in many countries. I use to earn some extra pin money in ME rewiring peoples villa's so the electric plugs didn't melt and showers didn't give you electric shocks in the morning. Not unusual to have a villa with only one electric ring main and a single 30amp fuse or no earth wire connected into the ground post!

    The usual minimum requirements for a work visa here in China is a 3 year full time degree or a specialist technical qualification like RR aero engine mechanic. Again many countries require a full time degree plus a TEFL certificate to issue a visa and usually its only the Cambridge CELTA recognised. Countries are moving away from hiring backpacking students as TEFL teachers and want qualified professionals with degrees, relevant qualifications and experience.
     
  4. asiantiger

    asiantiger New commenter

    FeB31: Incorrect. The CELTA is not the only recognised TEFL cert. No gov visa is based on having or not having a CELTA. Any TEFL cert is ok because it is up to the employer whether he accepts it or not and in China and Korea there are so many language schools throughout the country as well as Public School EFL jobs that they take @backpacking students" or at least students fresh out of college with a standard 2:2 BA degree and no CELTA. If they have one it may just help them secure the job. There is NO requirement in CHina to have a TEFL cert for a visa. You only need to be a native speaker and have a degree. Same for a lot of countries for TEFL teaching. Japan/Korea too. I am sorry but the word "CELTA" is an overused, spoilt word which only a few employers want. I do not have a CELTA per se, although my course WAS the now known CELTA but I just say I have a CELTA if I need to state this particular qual as it is much easier to just say I have this.
     
  5. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

  6. tigi

    tigi Occasional commenter

    Just had a look. Hanoi today over 200, Bangkok around 170. Beijing and Shanghai around 300-400 depending on exactly where you are. All of those are unsafe levels.
     
    ejclibrarian likes this.
  7. tigi

    tigi Occasional commenter

    In contrast I'm in Bucharest, which I wouldn't say is fabulous for me health-wise (love it) and the centre of the city is 51, the suburbs are in the 30s.
     
    lottee1000 and ejclibrarian like this.
  8. tigi

    tigi Occasional commenter

    Sofia, the "dirtiest city in the EU" which is in the midst of a pollution crisis and made the news last week with heavy pollution haze is now reading 37 just out of the centre though I expect the centre is higher.
     
    lottee1000 likes this.
  9. rouxx

    rouxx Senior commenter

    I was under the impression that things were pretty bad in Warsaw too, up there with some of the Chinese cities on a reasonably regular basis.
     
  10. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Established commenter

    I live there when im not working.... and i can honestly say hand on heart, i have never ever ever seen any bad polution issues whatsoever. I would even say its always seems cleaner than some cities i have been in the UK.
     
  11. willow78

    willow78 Occasional commenter

    Agreed I worked in Warsaw for a year, very clean, great city to live in.
     
  12. rouxx

    rouxx Senior commenter

    Ok - clearly I was misinformed.
     
  13. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Established commenter

    Perhaps they meant Walsall ;)
     
    rouxx and asiantiger like this.
  14. rouxx

    rouxx Senior commenter

    Seems like I am going deaf in my old age
     
    dumbbells66 likes this.
  15. tigi

    tigi Occasional commenter

    Warsaw today has readings of between 130-150 which is pretty high. I've been to Warsaw and found it to be clean and very pleasant but in the winter when it gets cold people use poor quality heaters and burn toxic materials meaning Poland looks very unpolluted in summer and quite bad in winter.

    The worst area in much of Europe throughout the year seems to be Ostrava in Czech. I look at the data most days to check my city but also get an idea of the bigger picture around the world as it is something that is very important to me when deciding on a place to live.
     
  16. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Established commenter

    In the winter in warszawa you need to be more worried about the snow and freezing temperatures... you wont be outside much so you dont need to worry to much about the pollution;)
     
  17. tigi

    tigi Occasional commenter

    Yeah I know @dumbbells66 I live in Bucharest where we are no strangers to extreme cold. Sadly the pollution still can make you quite ill if you either have to or want to leave your apartment.

    Warsaw is a great city and Poland is ace but maybe not for asthmatics.
     
  18. ScotLass33

    ScotLass33 New commenter

    Now im really stuck!

    Our main aim is to save enough money to come back home and put a healthy deposit down on our own home. As yet we do not own a home and with pay and living the way it is in the UK I really cannot see us managing to do it here. It would also be great to see a bit of the world while doing it.

    It seems to me that UAE is so expensive we'd spend almost every penny we earn just living. Minimal savings potential if any, especially considering the fact that it may be most difficult for my partner to work here.

    Everywhere else we have considered seems to suffer from pollution to the point that it may make me ill and be bad for our daughters health.

    Hmmm
     
  19. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Established commenter

    Im in africa and i earn just as much, if not more than most in the Middle East. Have you looked at IB schools? They seem to pay better packages than british schools.
     
  20. ScotLass33

    ScotLass33 New commenter

    No, I haven't really worked out the differences in pay between different types of schools. Just starting to do some research so I feel informed when jobs for Aug 19 start to appear. I will look into IB schools though. I think i may be a regular here for the next few months
     

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