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When will all the FE jobs come back?

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by hoobat, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. I've been in FE a long time (pre incorporation) but the recent cuts and general fear of more changes seem to make this period the worst I've known. Currently just made redundant and very few opportunities around to apply for and competing with hundreds in same position. It will improve (always does) but when do you all think the corner will be turned?
     
  2. I've been in FE a long time (pre incorporation) but the recent cuts and general fear of more changes seem to make this period the worst I've known. Currently just made redundant and very few opportunities around to apply for and competing with hundreds in same position. It will improve (always does) but when do you all think the corner will be turned?
     
  3. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Established commenter

    When someone turns round and realises that rebuilding manufacturing industry in going to require competent institutions to administer the thousands of apprenticeships required. And when someone realises that the kids coming out of free schools with Grade C GCSE Latin might need some practical skills in order to get a job.
     
  4. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    Exactly!
    This will probably happen comming up to an election.
     
  5. And which government is going to rebuild manufacturing industry, then?

     
  6. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    Lol! I was responding to the word "realises" in BBJ's comment. Who knows what is really going to happen?
     
  7. Of course, no one knows what's going to happen except in the very broadest of parameters: nothing will get better.
     
  8. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    Got edit wrong!
     
  9. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    I don't think it is as bad as all that, though, cardoon. We have to believe we are making progress or we may as well give up now.
     
  10. Ah, TCSC47, you are an admirable optimist. Of course, in some ways we do make progress, but it's a challenge to identify in what manner precisely. Fortunately - or unfortunately, depending on one's viewpoint - humans never give up, despite glaring evidence of the futility of their efforts.
    Still, just as a matter of idle interest, in which arenas do you feel we have to believe we are making progress?
     
  11. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    Lol! I'll have to think about it to give a coherent answer. I can comment on my my personal world, on society, on environment. But if we are talking about education and education politics, I have to admit I would struggle, but I'm sure I can come up with something -- umm,-- somewhere!
     
  12. Well, as it's an education forum, I suppose I thought you were referring to progress in education. I'll look forward to reading what you can come up with. I know I've set you a challenge though.
    Anyone else able to offer up examples of progress in the educational arena? All suggestions welcome.
     
  13. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter


    However, I would like to describe myself as a “natural” teacher and what often kicks in, in places like here, is the fact that as a "teacher", I have to convince my students that there is every point in doing whatever it is, that we are working towards, or they will simply give up! I don’t think you can have any level of progress without there being a belief that progress can be, and is being achieved.
    I am always very conscious that, whilst it is important to convey to the people who have the power to control the problems we have, I am much more likely to be read by aspiring teachers here, than by the politicians, and it is therefore more important to not dissuade these future teachers from becoming so.
    So to the facking politicians, -- get you facking fingers out, get real, and sort out the facking mess you have put education into. I have been a successful teacher and have sadly lived and worked through and witnessed nothing but the decline of UK education in all areas, from the time shortly after I entered teaching in the early 80’s, you Bar Stewards!! You lost my expertise, skills and good faith.
    However, to those of you who want to become teachers, it is one of the most important jobs you can do. It is rewarding, you can sleep at night, partly because you are exhausted, but also because you know you are doing something worthwhile that contributes to our society rather than sucks at it parasitically.
    Come the revolution!
     
  14. A heart-felt response, TCSC47. Who can disagree with your view that politicians have much to answer for on the quality of what's on offer.
    Perhaps you and I have a different understanding of what 'progress' means. But certainly I agree that a teacher must have some kind of evangelical conviction that what s/he does is worthwhile and important - cynicism is the worst attribute a teacher can have.
    I don't have much hope in the politicians' capacity to 'sort out the facking mess' though. Sorting things out is what politicians like to do and the results are pretty much always worse than ever.
     
  15. Having said this, there isn't an alternative to politicians, of course. One just wishes they weren't so perenially compelled to improve things without listening to the folks at the chalk face (or white board I should say these days). I'm sure you're at one with that perspective.
     
  16. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    I suspect you are using the term "improving things" ironically. In the case of education I really think there have been plenty of examples of cynical politicians who have played the "education card for self advancement. Thatcher (spit) being the "Big Momma" of them all, so as to speak!
    However, whilst Thatcher did actually go to a state school, I think many problems from our current crop of state bean counters, are that they went to public schools and were born with silver spoons in their mouths. Cammy and Cleggers are prime examples.
    I must exempt a few ministers of education, Estelle Morris and Charles Clarke but otherwise I think they are all pretty guilty of trying to demonstrate their machismo over the difficult challenge that education seems to present to them in the UK. Baker probably gets high ratings from the edu-phobes for taking a week away from the teacher's much needed stress release holidays.
    Sorry, -- back to this actual string concerning FE colleges, I doubt the silver spooned toffs in "charge" of us have any idea what FE colleges do! We don't train butlers and maids so what is our use!? It is ironic that whilst primary and secondary schools get too much attention and suffer for it, the FE sector gets virtually zilch! Who is the better off!? Neither of course.
     
  17. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    Hi Cardoon. Don't know if you are old enough to remember "Thatcher, Thatcher, milk snatcher"?, but it was Thatcher (spit) who took free milk away from school children in the 70's. Being the daughter of a grocer, it is pretty apparent that she had a hidden agenda, having probably grown up with family moans concerning an inability to sell milk!
    At this moment we are all watching free schools with, I'm sure, many people convinced that Gove has hidden agendas. Well perhaps not so hidden! Nothing less than the dismantling of any control LEAs have over the education establishments in their areas.
    B*ll*cks! There I was being sunny and optimistic and it has all evapourated!
    Rock on!
     

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