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When doing Guided Writing what do you always make sure you do...

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by sunshine84, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I am looking to improve my Guided Writing when I am working in small groups with the children. I just want to make sure I am spot on.

    What sort of things would you say are essential each time you teach writing in groups? I mean for example, I always talk to the children about staring their letters on the line (we teach cursive), full stops, capital letters, finger spaces etc. How do you encourage them to write the sounds they know? We currently have sound mats which depending on ability I ask the children to find the sound or help them to find it.
    What are the best ways to help the children hear the sounds in the words they want to write? I get them to say the word out loud and also encourage the use of robot arms.

    How do you manage the fact that if children are writing sentences, they will need help with different words all at the same time, a lot of my children still write one sound then say 'I have done it I have done it' rather than thinking of the other sounds in that same word and getting on with it! How is it best to manage this. I tend to write with 4 or 5 children at a time

    What sort of outcomes would you say really show you have moved the children on in writing sessions?

    I am still learning a lot in Year R and would appreciate any advice on any of the above!
     
  2. Hi,
    I am looking to improve my Guided Writing when I am working in small groups with the children. I just want to make sure I am spot on.

    What sort of things would you say are essential each time you teach writing in groups? I mean for example, I always talk to the children about staring their letters on the line (we teach cursive), full stops, capital letters, finger spaces etc. How do you encourage them to write the sounds they know? We currently have sound mats which depending on ability I ask the children to find the sound or help them to find it.
    What are the best ways to help the children hear the sounds in the words they want to write? I get them to say the word out loud and also encourage the use of robot arms.

    How do you manage the fact that if children are writing sentences, they will need help with different words all at the same time, a lot of my children still write one sound then say 'I have done it I have done it' rather than thinking of the other sounds in that same word and getting on with it! How is it best to manage this. I tend to write with 4 or 5 children at a time

    What sort of outcomes would you say really show you have moved the children on in writing sessions?

    I am still learning a lot in Year R and would appreciate any advice on any of the above!
     
  3. Hi Sunshine84
    I actually posted a similar topic a few days ago, its just further down the page but hasnt had any responses...yet. I'm really interested in knowing what others do too but heres how I run my sessions. I usually give a purpose to writing it could be from their interests or a letter from a character in the story that would like a response, or our class teddy might need some help writing a shopping list for class party etc So luckily when they come to write they are enthusiastic and willing. I dont stress about capital letters and full stops as I think for now the main focus is for them to hear the sounds in the words.
    I usually do my writing sessions with a group of 4 children.I talk about why we are doing what we are doing so they understand there is a pupose to it. We talk about what we might need pencils, alphabet mat, key words. What strategies we can use to help us, put word on fingers, chewing gum words-saying the word slowly, finding that sound on the alphabet mat. I encourage children to talk about what they are going to write, share with a partner, count how many words you want to write and draw lines to represent these words. I then go around the table spending time with each child, asking them what sounds they can hear?What word are you writing next? etc. My main concern is that I'm not extending/supporting my children enough. I'd like to know how much help others give their children.I also write on the board each day, and model sounding out words, putting words on fingers etc.
    I'm a tad brain dead but hope that was somewhat helpful.

     

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