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When bad behaviour gets worse?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by mathsboy3, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. I am currently teaching KS3/KS4 in a school where the discipline system is not working. Behaviour has gone downhill since the start of the year because students realise the consequences for poor behaviour are non existent! For example, telling a teacher to 'f*** off' results in being sent home (a day off!!) and then a day in isolation with their tutor on return. The refusal to follow instructions is a daily occurrence!! Students regularly play on mobile phones then refuse to hand over following numerous warnings!! They never (or very rarely) attend detentions, even with senior leaders, and there seems to be no consequence to this! To my knowledge, the school has excluded only 2 students so far this year and they were both for assault (teachers being punched and kicked). The inclusive policy of keeping students in class at all costs is having a massive negative effect on the learning of all and the morale of staff!! I am fairly new to teaching (2nd year) and have to say, this is not what I expected to find. I find I do very little teaching but a massive amount of crowd control!! I can't wait for the end of the year!! Any advice would be welcome!!
     
  2. I am currently teaching KS3/KS4 in a school where the discipline system is not working. Behaviour has gone downhill since the start of the year because students realise the consequences for poor behaviour are non existent! For example, telling a teacher to 'f*** off' results in being sent home (a day off!!) and then a day in isolation with their tutor on return. The refusal to follow instructions is a daily occurrence!! Students regularly play on mobile phones then refuse to hand over following numerous warnings!! They never (or very rarely) attend detentions, even with senior leaders, and there seems to be no consequence to this! To my knowledge, the school has excluded only 2 students so far this year and they were both for assault (teachers being punched and kicked). The inclusive policy of keeping students in class at all costs is having a massive negative effect on the learning of all and the morale of staff!! I am fairly new to teaching (2nd year) and have to say, this is not what I expected to find. I find I do very little teaching but a massive amount of crowd control!! I can't wait for the end of the year!! Any advice would be welcome!!
     
  3. Cervinia

    Cervinia Occasional commenter

    New job?
     
  4. Thanks, good suggestion - already trying!!!
     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I don't see how you can characterise a one day suspension followed by a one day exclusion from class as "non-existent" consequences. Actually, that would be pretty severe in some schools. It seems that students are obviously NOT being kept in class "at all costs" - pupils are excluded for swearing at staff and assault - but perhaps it offends you that they are not thrown out of school for using mobile phones.
    As your post stands, no advice other than what you have had already is appropriate.
     
  6. Nice to see you still doing your bit to champion low expectations Raymond.
     
  7. No Raymond, behaviour of any sort or the use of mobiles does not 'offend me' in any way!!
    What frustrates me though, is that this kind of behaviour can be repeated over and over, disrupting lessons and learning for ALL, with no alternative or ultimate punishment to put a stop to it!!
    How can this type of 'inclusive' policy possibly benefit the majority, if indeed it benefits anyone at all?
     
  8. Excluding children for a day is only a consequence if the parents actually care and punish the children at home.
    Your schools sounds very similar to mine mathsboy. The children pretty much do what they want as there are no punishments that they actually fear. Classroom teachers don't have the power to do anything (We can't even stand in front of doors to keep children in the room at breaks in case this "escalates" the problem!).
    A school that was put into Special Measures close to us had a team come in from Outwood Grange Academy. They introduced a "Black Room" that children actually feared and helped turn the place around. I find in my school that children are excluded for a week. Come back and continue to behave poorly and disrupt everyone else. Excluded for a week. And the cycle continues. Unless you have an SLT team who are prepared to come in and actually put systems and consequences in place that work you're pissing in the wind.
    I'm all for inclusion but when including one child ruins the education of the other 29 in the class I think they should be out of the classroom until they learn the basic levels of behaviour, manners and respect to allow them to function correctly within it.
    Keep your chin up, maths teachers are in such short supply you should easily find employment elsewhere.
     
  9. Just wondering though. Have you tried writing their names on the board? [​IMG]
     
  10. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    If they're out of the classroom until they've learned the basic rules of behaviour, how do you know they've learned the basic rules of behaviour until they're back in the classroom?
    Popular but largely vacuous soundbites don't actually improve pupil behaviour, you know.


     
  11. When they come back into the class room can they a) sit and listen to requests, b) follow these requests and c) do some work?

    If not, then back to the black room. Which does improve behaviour and results if the academy 2 miles away from my current school is anything to go by.

    Our 23% 5 A* - C including English and Maths suggests that our current policy of 5 day exclusions and having an isolation room big enough for 6 pupils in a school of 1,200+ isn't an adequate system.
     
  12. joedoggyuk

    joedoggyuk New commenter

    The priority isn't on reforming that one brat; the priority is education for the class.
    Similarly, prison may not be effective in reforming murderers, rapists and burglars; that doesn't mean that prison fails and these criminals should go free. It succeeds. It protects me. It protects you. It puts a brick wall between us and them.
     

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