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when a child refuses to leave class

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by izzywhizzal, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. izzywhizzal

    izzywhizzal Occasional commenter

    I'm at a school where exclusion is not an option.We have had a few incidents recently where children are particularly disruptive and need to leave class. What can we do when they refuse? It isn't easy for two or three members of staff to carry Y6 children out of class which is what they are having to do..any great alternatives received with thanks!
     
  2. izzywhizzal

    izzywhizzal Occasional commenter

    I'm at a school where exclusion is not an option.We have had a few incidents recently where children are particularly disruptive and need to leave class. What can we do when they refuse? It isn't easy for two or three members of staff to carry Y6 children out of class which is what they are having to do..any great alternatives received with thanks!
     
  3. I have run a nurture room in a primary school and have therefore been the person who will have been called upon to deal with "Joe" and couldn't agree more with "coolasacucumber"
    Let/Be the teacher teach the rest of the class. Call for backup
    Keep calm, use broken record technique, trashed classroom will equal a sanction as will physical intervention to remove bur always give them a way out to save face (theirs). Constant reiteration of their options and the consequences of the choice (positive and negative)
    They will tidy a trashed classroom
    Sadly, on occasions, physical intervention is where you have to go. With the correct training 2 adults should be able to remove a Y6 child (even one larger than average). Once you've gone there, a careful follow up can move a relationship forward. They know how far they can push and will feel safer knowing it. Some children are that damaged.
    Once an incident is over - insist on a debrief. Let out your frustrations, concerns. Look at the incident closely. Fill in paperwork. What can be learned? I have had a Y6 child who once we realised he wanted the physical intervention as the best physical contact he could have, putting in positive physical contact eliminated incidents where he would force restraint as our only option and yes, this included giving him a hug when he wanted one!
    At the risk of sounding over dramatic - we are the grown ups - they have to trust that we will be tough when they need us to be and fair at all times (even when they don't think we are).
    At the risk of sounding flippant - carrying deodourant is also essential as the more adrenalin is suppressed the stronger it smells!
     
  4. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    You may not have exclusion (dear God) but surely the school must have some kind of internal removal policy, and an internal room where extreme spectrum children can be taken?
    If not then the school is witless. Pressing all children into the same room serves only the people who don't have to deal with it, and any Head who insisted on this should be made to resit their entrance exams.
    There isn't a significantly better alternative to removal- it is entirely necessary for the good of everyone, including the guilty party. Of course prevention is even better, but the only way to generate this is by making sure the pupil realises that every time they kick off they will be disempowered rather than have their ego fed. And that's what removal and sanctions are about. So prevention becomes a part of the feedback from reaction.
    Good luck
    Tom
    Read more from Tom
    here
    on his blog, or
    follow
    him. His latest book,Teacher,
    is out now, published by Continuum/ Bloomsbury

     

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