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What's the difference between a LSA and a LSP?

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by freckles88, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. I know one is a learning support assistant and the other a practitoner but what is the actual difference?
    I always thought that a TA/LSA/LSP is one in the same thing but I am applying for a job as a LSP and want to know if there is anything specific in case they ask me about it at interview. I am assuming that maybe it is just a little more invlolved than a LSA and more 1:1 based?? I am currently classed as a TA but I work 1:1 with a SEN child so really I should probably be classed more as a LSA than a general TA as I don't do much general TA things (i.e. classroom displays, reading with children etc) as my whole job centres around one child...
    Is there anyone here who is a LSP and how does your job differ from that of a LSA or TA? Thanks :)
     
  2. I know one is a learning support assistant and the other a practitoner but what is the actual difference?
    I always thought that a TA/LSA/LSP is one in the same thing but I am applying for a job as a LSP and want to know if there is anything specific in case they ask me about it at interview. I am assuming that maybe it is just a little more invlolved than a LSA and more 1:1 based?? I am currently classed as a TA but I work 1:1 with a SEN child so really I should probably be classed more as a LSA than a general TA as I don't do much general TA things (i.e. classroom displays, reading with children etc) as my whole job centres around one child...
    Is there anyone here who is a LSP and how does your job differ from that of a LSA or TA? Thanks :)
     
  3. Hi work as an EAL support assist.and I had been told on my course that these names refer to the same post ( teaching assistant) but to my opinion a practitioner is someone who is still practicing and the others are those who have finished and gained more experience. Again, this my opinion and even the experienced tutors do not give a convincing explanation...and also unless the disability of the child is severe there is no one to one with pupils because this way children become more dependent and tend to rely a lot on the adult so the adult is expected to support all the others on the table.i also, think it is very difficult to keep up to our job word by word cause when working in a school one should make themselves flexible to do other things up to a certain limit.coming to your query finally. I am not LSP but I can see a slight difference between my job and that of a LSA.Hope this is of some help.Good Luck
     
  4. Wotton

    Wotton Established commenter

    I think they are all the different names for the same job. What you do will vary from school to school and your job description. In my school I am a TA but it is not in my job description to do displays or photo copying. I am there to work with the children either in groups or 1 to 1.
     
  5. I'm sorry, but I really have to take issue with this (I've tried to resist, but I can't[​IMG])
    A 'practitoner' is someone who is doing the job they are trained for. Doctors are 'practitioners', they even work in a 'practice' (A Doctor's Practice).
    It shouldn't be confused with 'practise' which is the repeated rehearsal of skills in order to learn them. Though, just to complicate things, this rehearsal of skills is 'practice' 'She did her piano practice daily'
     
  6. Ophelia 9

    Ophelia 9 New commenter

    I'm feeling virtuous now, maizie, because I did manage to resist![​IMG]
    I am surprised to see that lots of different job titles seem to be creeping back in these days (of course, it may be that in some areas they were never standardised under the catch-all 'Teaching Assistant' label as we were here in 2004.) I suspect money-saving to be an issue with this - we've just had several new support staff employed on the lowest grade but with high-falutin job titles which sound like they should be at least two grades higher!

     
  7. Of course, the problem in 2004 was that there never was a generic 'Teaching Assistant'. There was, as now, a huge variety of roles and people employed with vastly different training and levels of training. Why the support staff unions ever let the generic title be used in the Workforce Agreement is a mystery to me.
     
  8. Ophelia 9

    Ophelia 9 New commenter

    I think one of the problems about all the different job titles was the lack of any standardisation, not only across different LEAs but even within them. The 'pecking order', for want of a better description varied so that a Classroom Assistant was seen as the 'top' job in some places but the lowest in others.
    Also, within our authority there were even different hours of employment for the same level of pay: as I recall, Nursery Nurses and Integration Assistants were employed for 32.5 hours but Classroom Assistants only did 27.5 hours (plus a 'buffer' time) for exactly the same annual pay. My head at one point wanted to change all the classroom support staff to the LSA job title, but the HR department said that this would be seen as a change of role for me with consequences regarding my terms and conditions.
    Whilst I personally was unhappy with taking the TA job title, the 2004 Agreement for us did make the situation much more fair across the board here and there was a reasonable pay rise for most of us too. I suspect union membership amongst support staff was pretty low here at that time (I wasn't so involved in those days so don't know for sure) so unions may have felt they had little backing to raise objections.
    This is yet another reason why the SSSNNB was so desparately needed - I really feel we going backwards now as far as school support staff are concerned and once again there seem to be more unqualified staff being employed in schools. I am astonished at the number of postings on here from people who are completing some kind of TA qualification without having to set foot in a school - is it just me that finds this very worrying?
     

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