1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

What would convince you to employ a peri in the classroom?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by violin1, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. I'm looking for the opinions of anyone involved in recruitment. I am a qualified secondary teacher but have never worked as such - always a violin teacher. I have taught whole class violin etc. but would love to teach full-time in a primary school, but every application I send just get rejected. What can I write on my application forms that will convince a school that I am capable of teaching across the curriculum? I'm thinking maybe I need to get some volunteer experience, but don't have time after my 6 day week around 18 different schools! I also would not be able to afford a pay cut.
    It really worries me that the reputation of visiting music teachers will always cloud the judgement of those recruiting so that they will always disregard the application before even getting an interview.
    Help!
     
  2. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    No, it's not because you are a violin teacher. Not because you are a peri. There's a very good reason why you are not being short;isted.
    You're not going to like this answer. What you need to write on your application is:
    • I am Primary trained
    • I am Primary experienced at whole-class teaching across the curriculum
    • I understand and am familiar with all the Primary teaching initiatives
    • My whole-class teaching of core subjects (literacy, numeracy, etc.) has been observed and judged "outstanding"
    The truth, the sad truth, of the situation is that there is an over-supply, a glut, of Primary trained and experienced teachers. In these circumstances, you are highly unlikely ever to get shortlisted in competition with these candidates. Not what you wanted to hear. Sorry! ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
    I am timetabled for the October 22nd Win that teaching job seminars - see you there!
     
  3. So I have no hope of getting a teaching job in the sector I am experienced in then (primary)? Even if I were to retrain, you think I would still be over-qualified/too expensive because of my previous career? Surely there should be some career path for me outside of peri work as there is certainly none within the profession!
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    But, but . . . you are <u>not </u>experienced in the primary curriculum. Sorry, but you are not. THAT is the experience that counts, not teaching violin. Not the answer that you wanted, sorry.
    To re-train you would have to fund yourself. As QTS, in theory, qualifies you to teach all school-age children, you would get no funding.
    Too expensive? Oh dear . . .
    You aren't going to like this reply either. You will be paid at the bottom of the scale, as a beginning teacher.
    You have not yet done your induction year, it would seem. You would be a NQT. You have no relevant experience that is likely to cause any school to give you extra money, in the current climate. They will stick to the rules, and those are that you normally start at the bottom of the scale.
    You could try a post as a NQT in Music in Secondary. Or alternatively try the independent sector to teach Primary Music.
    As a NQT. At a NQT salary.
    Go to the Independent Forum and read the Welcome thread there, that might give you some ideas. They are more likely to have Music specialists in an indy prep school than in a maintained one.
    You could also try John H in the Careers Clinic to see if he has any good ideas.
    But my view is that I would not consider you for a post as a classroom teacher in a Primary School.
    Sorry!
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
    I am timetabled for the October 22nd Win that teaching job seminars - see you there!
     
  5. So my only options outside of peri work are supply then? Seems very harsh for a qualified teacher! And no I never did an NQT year in main music teaching but would be happy to take an NQT salary, I just think it would be stupid of me to try for a secondary job when I have no experience or confidence with that age group!
    I wonder if there is any obligation within peri teaching for my manager to support me in getting experience outside of my specialism?
     
  6. Also, I qualified BEFORE an induction year was required!
     
  7. Aw, I really sympathise. But the job situation is really bad and you lose out for the tiniest thing, so it's hard to imagine someone getting the job with a pretty huge thing. I've got a primary PGCE from a top provider, outstanding references, etc. and am still unable to land an NQT post. It is just a shitstorm out there!
    Also, you know primary is different to secondary, not just less in-depth subject knowledge and fewer hormones?! [​IMG] What you need to know is different. In secondary, it's a given that everybody can read - and those who can't are shipped out to LSA-led interventions. In primary you've got to know how to teach somebody to read, to be able to explain why 11 comes after 10, etc. I'm working in a secondary school now and feel pretty sure I could hack it as a secondary English teacher, but I'd actually be completely daunted at the idea of attempting primary teaching without the training, Heck, sometimes even with it!
    I agree with Theo about the independent sector (personal feelings aside...) - just this week, I saw an local private school advertising for a music specialist KS2 class teacher - you had to have a Music degree for it. Or start out volunteering to hear readers, get into a TA/LSA role and try to gain experience that way. But when the job market's so wretched, what if you still don't get what you want after all that free/badly-paid work?
    Huge sympathy! x
     
  8. Will try middle schools - trouble is I live in a very static area where job vacancies are very few and far between.
    Supply teaching might be the way to go but the uncertainty makes me so nervous [​IMG]
     

Share This Page