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What to take on supply?

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by rapink, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. rapink

    rapink New commenter

    I'm an NQT about to start supply work. Quite nervous as obviously I won't have any idea where I'm going/ what will happen etc. What am I best taking with me? I'm doing EYFS and KS1 supply. Do I need to have a bank of websites and worksheets? Do you usually get plans left? Hoping I can decipher any I do get. Has anyone got any tips/ websites they tend to use. Thanks
     
  2. rapink

    rapink New commenter

    I'm an NQT about to start supply work. Quite nervous as obviously I won't have any idea where I'm going/ what will happen etc. What am I best taking with me? I'm doing EYFS and KS1 supply. Do I need to have a bank of websites and worksheets? Do you usually get plans left? Hoping I can decipher any I do get. Has anyone got any tips/ websites they tend to use. Thanks
     
  3. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    You don't need to be armed with millions of resources on supply, I've always taken the bare minimum. If you are predominantly working in Early Years and Key Stage One then take a text which you can read to the class, but also derive a lesson from. In my experience, Early Years Teachers never prepare any activities for supply teachers, and the Nursery Nurse seems to think they are in charge of you. The good schools will always prepare for the supply, but there will be the odd time you'll be thrown in the deep end. If you are, find out what the class have previously covered- look in children's books or ask the TA and just follow on from there. Try and stick to the class teacher's plans rather than devise your own lesson. They'll be more thankful for the consistency. Remember to relax, the majority of your day will be spent on behavior management, and if you don't get that right in the first ten minutes of entering any class, no lesson plan or preparation will matter. Good luck.
     
  4. I take a number matching game that we can play on the carpet, a book with related literacy and numeracy activities, a couple of phonics games and a story for hometime that I hope they won't have heard before. Usually the day is all planned for you but on a few occasions nothing has been left and I have been able to open my bag and begin teaching within seconds. There is loads of stuff on the Resources section that is suitable so have a browse.
     
  5. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    my experience is that you will find one agency gradually takes over, eventually I dropped the other two cos they never got me any work.
     
  6. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    When I first went into supply - I put my CV online. I can't remember the site, but I got contacted by 100's of agents. I had no idea who was good or anything, but the first agency I registered with told me they were inundated with work and didn't have enough teachers. Another agency said my area was their busiest- both these agencies failed to deliver. I signed up with an agency, who registered me within a couple of days, used my current CRB and offered me work within the hour of being compliant. I think I was registered with a total of nine agents, one being my main agency and the others sporadically giving me work. Experience has taught me the best time to sign with an agency is peak periods- third or four week in September to around Easter. If you sign up with them now, they'll just forget who you are. Also if an agent puts you forward for a position, and you don't get it, they might not use you again. After all you're just cattle they need to sell at the market.
     
  7. roverlei

    roverlei New commenter

    hammie's right. One agency will become your pillar, through 'natural selection', in my experience. I usually drop agencies who continuously offer me long-term supply in subject areas I'm not actually qualified in. That kind of suggests they've not bothered to actually read my CV.
     
  8. Things to take - white board markers, biro's, pencil sharpner, stickers, and your own mug. Oh, and a coat - it will always be your yard duty. A few open-ended 'differentiation by outcome' activities are useful too.
     
  9. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    pencil sharpener is a very good reminder (and erasers)
    If you buy some pencils, don't bother with the supermarket cheapos, they are rubbish.
    Staples pots of professional pencils are reasonable value and are good quality. With erasers on the end for younger pupils, definitely without for dodgy comps as the rubbers get taken off and flicked around. In fact for most comps, don't lend anything much as it just gets taken or broken. Send them to the head of dept for supplies instead.
    and always remember your paperwork, ID etc from the agency some schools ignore it, but there is always the other that insists on pcopying EVERYTHING!
    and if you get cover for an obiously pregnant teacher, do everything really well, it may lead to a longer term post if you want one!
     

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