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What to plan for the first day/week as an NQT???

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by jimfrompreston, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. Hi all,

    I'm about to embark on my NQT year at a school in Lancashire in a Year 4 class. I have absolutely no idea how to plan for the first day and what kind of activities I should get the children doing on their first week back. Do I just get the children doing 'proper' work from the very first moment or what?!

    Any advice would be brilliant as i'm massively stressing out and panicking.

    Cheers!

    Jim
     
  2. Hi all,

    I'm about to embark on my NQT year at a school in Lancashire in a Year 4 class. I have absolutely no idea how to plan for the first day and what kind of activities I should get the children doing on their first week back. Do I just get the children doing 'proper' work from the very first moment or what?!

    Any advice would be brilliant as i'm massively stressing out and panicking.

    Cheers!

    Jim
     
  3. Set your class rules/expectations etc at the start then teach them. That is what you are there to do after all!
     
  4. Hi Jim, do you have other colleagues in Year 4? Perhaps find out what they intend to do. But if you are one form entry, I usually find some drama activities helps the class to get to know each other a bit better and is fun too. What is your topic this term? Get the children to pose their own questions about what they want to know about the topic. You could do a Circle Time to share holiday experiences. I usually steer away from getting them to write a recount in their new Literacy books as their very first piece after 6 weeks off, but if you feel the need, then do it on paper - this will give you a good headsup as to where they are in ability terms for literacy. Defintely do some art or something creative and some PE. You could get them to write about their Hopes and dreams for the coming year on a personal level, and academic. Personally I would get going with Numeracy. If you have the medium term planning for the autumn term this will help you deciding what to do. Good luck!
     
  5. Sillow

    Sillow Senior commenter

    As PFF says, a short lesson on expectations/rules/routines and then straight into normal lessons. You will set yourself up as a teacher who means business if you go in teaching straight away; the children will see that you are not someone who will spend lots of time faffing around with fun activities but not actually getting the children to do some work. Your plan of the week can include the "fun" lessons like ICT and Art but if introduced as part of the timetable the children won't come to expect them at the beginning/end of every term and will understand they are there to learn!
    Good luck with it and don't be afraid to be strict for the first three or four weeks, then gradually ease off. The children will respect you much more and you will (hopefully) have fewer behavioural problems! (This is me speaking from experience! I like to be very strict at first now, it really helps.)
     
  6. Brilliant advice from all of you! Thank you so much for it all. They tell you all the time about the 'Don't smile before Christmas' rule but think i'll just go for the 'being strict for 3 weeks or so rule instead.

    Just sorted out my timetable for the lessons... Now just have to start planning which is not going to be fun. Heyho! Hope all three of you are enjoying your hols. Thanks again for the advice, greatly appreciated.

    Jim
     
  7. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    I cannot stress strongly enough how much you should go in and immediately establish routine and order. Fun and exciting activities shall be earned when the children ahve proven that they can follow the classroom rules.
    I'm not suggesting you should be evil - there is plenty of room for praise - but you need to establish yourself.
    You won't regret it. I personally wouldn't do any airy-fairy activities, just get them on with straight-forward work.
     
  8. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    From experience - myself and other teachers- is better to start strict and then gradually relax than to try and do the opposite. Do ensure you get all the appropriate information from the school regarding sanctions and behaviour management and use any standard school formats for planning and lessons. Have some short activities up your sleeve to use if you find yourself finishing more quickly than anticipated or have to cover a lesson at last minute. There are a lot of ideas on the TES resources.
     
  9. I am also starting in a Year 4 class in Lancashire in September. I have already had 4 days with the class where we constructed the class rules and expectations together, made an 'our talents' paper chain (which they really enjoyed doing, especially when they stuck them together) and a 'you are special because...' quote for every child (again a really nice activity and it helped me automatically see who were the more advanced writers)...so you may want to do some things like that.
    I will be recapping these things the first morning as 4 children were away and I also have a number of little angels in my class who may 'forget' the class rules and expectations over the summer! After that I am under the impression that we will be straight in to curriculum work.

    Hope this helps a little!
     
  10. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    They're Y4 - they've been together a fair old while by now, so why would they need help to 'get to know each other'?
    Get in, set your stall out, get teaching. There's nothing to lose and everything to gain, whereas faffing about gives you everything to lose.
     

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