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what to do?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by confusedaspie, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. confusedaspie

    confusedaspie New commenter

    Im at the end of my tether and worried, could anyone please offer any help?
    I am year 4 and have a child in my class with severe behaviour problems. He has spent 3 and a half days a week out of class in a behaviour unit within school since coming to year 4 however is coming back to class full time. He does not comply with instructions and apart from one subject does not willingly take part in others. Various incidents have been turning my classroom upside down, trying and succeeding escaping from school, numerous incidents of kicking headbutting and hitting other children. I am aware the transfer back to class will be difficult for him and have pre empted this through talking to him and creating a behaviour chart. Today he hit a child at dinner and from this he ripped up his behaviour chart, refused to comply with a lesson we were taking part in and had to be removed from class. smt Are very unsupportive in behaviour, very much the class teachers fault. Been told I am not handling him appropriately enough and when he kicks off I should sit the children in a circle and shield them with my body. We are not allowed to send them to the head or deputy either. I dont know where to go next. Please any advice?
     
  2. confusedaspie

    confusedaspie New commenter

    Im at the end of my tether and worried, could anyone please offer any help?
    I am year 4 and have a child in my class with severe behaviour problems. He has spent 3 and a half days a week out of class in a behaviour unit within school since coming to year 4 however is coming back to class full time. He does not comply with instructions and apart from one subject does not willingly take part in others. Various incidents have been turning my classroom upside down, trying and succeeding escaping from school, numerous incidents of kicking headbutting and hitting other children. I am aware the transfer back to class will be difficult for him and have pre empted this through talking to him and creating a behaviour chart. Today he hit a child at dinner and from this he ripped up his behaviour chart, refused to comply with a lesson we were taking part in and had to be removed from class. smt Are very unsupportive in behaviour, very much the class teachers fault. Been told I am not handling him appropriately enough and when he kicks off I should sit the children in a circle and shield them with my body. We are not allowed to send them to the head or deputy either. I dont know where to go next. Please any advice?
     
  3. Firstly, do you have any additional adult support in the classroom? If so, I would suggest that if an incident occurs in your classroom, you ask that adult to take all the other children out of the room to prevent harm to them. If you don't have any extra adult, your school needs to come up with a way to alert an extra pair of hands to your need for support - an "emergency" tag a sensible child can take to another room, for example.
    That obviously leaves you to deal with the one child, and not need to use yourself as a shield. Have you been on any training on how to handle and/or restrain a violent child? If not, I suggest you put in a written request to your SMT asking to be booked on such a course as a matter of priority. (In the meantime, maybe a member of the SMT could teach your class for a day for you observe how you should be handling this child?!?!? [​IMG])
    As for the idea that you shoudl not be sending a violent child to SMT to deal with.... that just seems madness. It is SMT who will be seeing the stream of complaining parents when other children get injured.
    You need to have a written risk assessment/plan of action for dealing with this child, which all relevant staff have agreed upon and are aware of.
    If you are still not happy, contact your Union's regional office.

     
  4. I work in an EBD school and going out of bounds would result in the pupil losing his shoes for the rest of the day - a very obvious symbol of what he had done and a loss of personal freedom.

    As well as restraint for assaults on other pupils, staff in my particulr school have a much more tactile relationship with the children, that can help them keep calm. It sounds like you're caught between a rock and a hard place in that restraint is out (they really want to to shield the children? what about the resulting assault to you?) and likewise your school's policy will probably restrict you from positive physical contact?

    What about his parents? The behaviour could be in his environment, but I'd try to see if you can get his parents/carers on board and have a behaviour book that passes between you and them. That way they could warn you of incidents at home and you can write to them about incidents at school. They'd need to sign it to make sure they've seen it! If that doesn't work, you'd need their mobile number so you could inform them of any problems over the phone and agree on measures to deal with him.

    The behaviour chart should be scrupulous and very clear, and could include penalties (including the number of warnings before further measures) but also work targets (start work quietly and complete the work assigned etc.) and rewards for good work. A good mark or a bad mark could be given after each lesson to keep him on track.

    Penalties wise, what sort of action do you take after physical assault? Losing playtime will probably require loss of your time, but perhaps a TA would be willing to do it? Do these incidents happen more after the lunchtime playtime? Perhaps that is contributing to him being hyper? If so, perhaps adults regulating the playground should be assigned to supervise him until his behaviour is far better, or keep him inside.

    What subject does he like? Perhaps it could be used as leverage, to win him over a bit or as a penalty for bad behaviour (have other work assigned for him).

    Can the school provide any further help? 1:1 TA to mentor him? If his behaviour settles could another pupil shadow/mentor him? Ask the behaviour unit to give you all the info on his background to find out what's really going on...
     

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