1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

What to do with green bananas?

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by gargoyle770, Feb 5, 2011.

  1. Hello lovely cookery people!
    I need some help with a troublesome bunch of bananas. I bought some 'eat me, keep me' bananas last Saturday and have eaten the 'eat me' ones, but the 'keep me' ones refuse to ripen.
    What can I do with them? I don't want to throw them away, it seems so wasteful.

     
  2. Hello lovely cookery people!
    I need some help with a troublesome bunch of bananas. I bought some 'eat me, keep me' bananas last Saturday and have eaten the 'eat me' ones, but the 'keep me' ones refuse to ripen.
    What can I do with them? I don't want to throw them away, it seems so wasteful.

     
  3. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    Treat them as a veg! They can be peel and boiled, or sliced and fried....very nice with curry!
     
  4. have you tried putting them in a brown paper bag to help them ripen?
     
  5. Really? Never heard of that! Is it the darkness that helps? Would it have the same effect if I covered them with a tea towel?
     
  6. Bethannie, how long should they be boiled for? Would you put in with something (like a curry) or boil them separately?
     
  7. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    Gargoyle- no it needs to be a brown paper bag. This trick works with avocadoes too. And for a curry, just chop them and bung them in with the other veg. My flatmate used to make banana curry often in our student flat. Haven't tried it since.
     
  8. I've gotta say, banana in curry does not sound at all appealing!
    I'll give it a go, after all what's the worst that can happen?
    I might find I like it...
     
  9. If you can't find a paper bag place them next to anything ripe - sqiushy tomatoes and almost gone soft apples work well.
    We are so used to bananas ripening other things we forget (or never get told) that other stuff does it too!
     
  10. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Bananas give off ethylene gas which helps them to ripen. Keeping them in a paper bag works because it helps keep the gas in close proximity. They also need to take in oxygen so a paper bag being porous, allows enough oxygen in to achieve this whereas a plastic bag wouldn't. Obviously, having more than one banana in the bag will create more ethylene and ripen them faster.
     
  11. Gosh, you learn something new every day!
    Thanks mm, I feel quite edjermecated! [​IMG]
     
  12. If you don't have a brown paper bag - newspaper works too. Just wrap them up and they will ripen.
    It very definitely has to be paper though - not a plastic bag.
    If you stick in an apple or a tomato, it speeds the process up even further, as will wrapping them in a damp tea towel before sealing them in the paper bag/bag made of newspaper.


     

Share This Page