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What should the perfect school/college look like?

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by zmmartin, Apr 28, 2019.

  1. zmmartin

    zmmartin New commenter

    Hi

    I am currently building an educational provider from scratch for 16-19year olds! It's brilliant and equally scary. However, with just my own input, i am worried my Secondary English background is not enough to support certain issues or that it is not enough of a perspective to get going.

    It is an opportunity for me to design education the way we - as teachers - think it should be done!
    For a start, i have time to mark in house and staff are paid for this in allocated hours.

    I am therefore reaching out to the wider community for your combined experience. We all know something needs to change, and this is my chance to make a start.

    What does the perfect school/college look like to you?
     
  2. Educ84Math

    Educ84Math New commenter

    Wow - great idea !

    My background - 13 years as a secondary maths teacher in Scotland; currently in college (and much happier !). What I found has made the most difference in helping learners do well in exams is the quality of resources used throughout the year (yes, all the various teaching strategies, homework, etc. do make a difference, but only very slightly, and not to most learners who have many other things to deal well).

    Quite a demanding task, but here are some ideas off the top of my head :

    (1) Allow staff time to discuss, create and proof-read class tests, question sheets, etc. .

    (2) Have a batch of lessons (preferably typed) available for all courses/units for students online (in the form of a Blackboard or Google Classroom style format) - not as a replacement for attending classes of course :). If anyone misses a lesson, it's their responsibility to catch up; this is related to '(3)' below.

    (3) Since it's 16-19, the onus should be heavily on the learners to show initiative and ask for help when required. Of course, the teacher should ensure all learners are doing what they're told, but as long as the teacher delivers the lessons and helps the learners, they should not then be criticised for any failures on the part of the learners (this is the main difference I have found between school and college - the way things are done in college is the way things should be done in schools; of course, there are many factors that get in the way of this, such as finances, parental involvement/responsibility etc.).

    (4) Behaviour issues - as I'm sure you're aware, this is the number 1 reason for learners underperforming academically and teachers leaving the profession. Personally, I left because of too much red tape and not being allowed to push pupils academically (!!!). I have generally adopted a zero tolerance approach to behaviour, and it has served me very well. To clarify, the issue is one of time - having to constantly deal with recalcitrant offenders affects the learning of everyone else in the class, time which nobody can get back. Continual misbehaviour ? Kick them out of the school.

    That's all for now. Will post more as and when I can remember.
     

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