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what should phonics look like in KS2?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by merlymoo, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. Have had no traing in phonics but have to teach it to my clas of Y3 & 4s. Their levels range from 1c to 3a. I have had a copy of letters and sounds thrust upon me and have managed to download some plans from TES resources. I am currently splitting my class in 2 with me doing the lower achieving group (because there are a handful of monsters in that group) while my TA takes the higher achieving group but mine are retaing practically nothing. We have a time slot to do this each day rather than trying to squeeze it into Literacy. I just wondered what plans, games, resources or clever tricks other people are using or any clever ideas I have not thought of!
     
  2. Have had no traing in phonics but have to teach it to my clas of Y3 & 4s. Their levels range from 1c to 3a. I have had a copy of letters and sounds thrust upon me and have managed to download some plans from TES resources. I am currently splitting my class in 2 with me doing the lower achieving group (because there are a handful of monsters in that group) while my TA takes the higher achieving group but mine are retaing practically nothing. We have a time slot to do this each day rather than trying to squeeze it into Literacy. I just wondered what plans, games, resources or clever tricks other people are using or any clever ideas I have not thought of!
     
  3. My school does phonics right up to Year 6 (we have a designated time every day straight after break)...More able/KS2 children follow the "Support for spelling" document rather than Letters and Sounds. I would suggest that you continue to split into 2 groups...the less able continue working through letters and sounds (repeating phases if necessary- lots of practical work/games- we use the "phonics play" website and have some phonics resource boxes which have games etc in. They were quite expensive but the whole school uses them.)Then maybe your more able group could follow "support for spelling" document which takes thing on a little further than letters and sounds (for example my more able Y2s are currently following support for spelling and working on adding "ing/ed" - following rules such as dropping the e or doubling the consonant.)
    Failing that...could your very lowest ability children join in with KS1 phonics?Could they go toY1 or Y2 class for the phonics slot each day?




     
  4. karentee

    karentee New commenter

    you are right to split them and to take the lower ability children yourself, have you assessed which sounds they don't know? I'd start with that and teach to their gaps, make sure they can recognise the sound, write it and use it in words. I would repeat these sounds every day until they get it. I have phonics every day and teach it for about 20 minutes, it is very repetitive but the children learn their sounds quickly.
     
  5. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

  6. Letters and Sounds is arguably detailed guidance and not a programme. It is also not designed for key stage 2 and is not rigorous or content-rich enough.
    Teachers and teaching assistants need a surprising amount of step-by-step resources for daily phonics for reading, spelling and writing. They should never have been told that they could choose Letters and Sounds as a 'programme' - but, as this was put forward as a programme, it should have been evaluated and compared with what other programmes have to offer by way of structure, content and supportive daily resources.
    As Letters and Sounds has only 6 photocopiable 'Phoneme Spotter Stories' (although you cannot 'see' a phoneme), this a pitiable to say the least. Everything else in terms of content in Letters and Sounds has to be turned into a teaching and learning resource by the school.
     
  7. I send out a CD of over 350 Reading & Spelling Resources. They
    follow a structured multisensory programme of phonics & sight words.
    Although originally made for dyslexic pupils, I have used them with
    children who have reading & spelling difficulties for a variety of
    reasons. Many of the resources would be very useful in any primary /
    early years classroom.
    email for a list of the reources on the CD + some examples: margaret2612@btinternet.com
    website: www.helpingdyslexia.co.uk
     
  8. The first thing u need to do is shed the notion that phonics is much use beyond KS1.
    My blogs and website will help u understand why:
    www.englishspellingproblems.co.uk<font size="3"> </font>http://englishspellingproblems.blogspot.com http://www.improvingenglishspelling.blogspot.com/ With your low achievers, concentrate first and foremost on improving their reading skills. And don't be afraid to make them aware that most of their difficulties are due to the irregularities of English spelling.
     
  9. As I am using synthetic phonics extremely successfully to help struggling readers at KS3 I would suggest that your comment is not worth taking any notice of.
     
  10. Many of the schools where I provide training/professional development in phonics ask me in so that key stage two colleagues can build on the systematic synthetic phonics teaching in Reception and key stage one.
    Also, teachers and teaching assistants recognise that weaker readers/spellers need good phonics teaching for reading, spelling and linked to handwriting beyond key stage one.
    mashabell - it's as if your campaign to achieve simplified spelling is closing your mind to what we outline regarding the advantages of phonics teaching. Have you ever looked at the kind of visual aids and teaching techniques which contribute to the synthetic phonics teaching principles?
     
  11. Yes. And good visual aids help all teaching,
    but the fundamental English literacy problem remains its spelling inconsistencies.
    There would be no endless debates about how best to teach children to read and write
    if it wasn't for silly spellings like 'you, said, your, young, youth....
    They are responsible for making English literacy learning exceptionally slow,
    tricky to teach and too many children getting little benefit from their schooling.
    Good teaching helps many children to overcome them, but by no means all,
    but they should not need overcoming in the first place.
    English spelling does not have to stay as daft as it is.
    Young children keep showing us in their writing every day how English spelling could be improved: frend, sed, bruther, uther, muther, Wensday, scool, rool, hav, giv ...
    We could start a collection of children's sensible but 'incorrect' spellings on here.

     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    It is in all the successful schools in my area
     
  13. We use Ruth Miskin in our school and the Fresh Start program in yr 5/6.
     
  14. Thanks for some helpful suggestions.
    Karentee - unfortunately some of my LA know nothing except Sh/ch/th/ee. All I seem to be doing at the mo is going over and over the same sounds at the start of the session working up to simple sentences incorporating these sounds. Its boring me and presumably the children. Have no games but will take a look at the phonics play website.
    Literacy coordinator is completely clueless so no point asking her.
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I would take time to find out which phonemes the children know and take that as your starting point for teaching.
    Phonics International gives a good overview and the children will enjoy the phonics play games
     
  16. More and more people are saying that too much phonics turns many children off books for the rest of their lives.
    Try doing phonics in context with some fun things like 'The Cat in the Hat'
    or some verses from The Pied Piper, with real books instead of contrived phonic texts.
    Concentrate on simply teaching English with reading and writing.
    And remember that the main reason for many children still not 'getting' phonics by Yr 4 and 5 is because of inconsistencies like 'bed - said - head --- paid, lead;
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Masha do you really imagine that teachers aren't using "real" books in their English lessons?
     

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