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What should I include in my GTP application letter?

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by Teacher_Jen, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. Ok guys,
    I'm applying for a GTP starting Sept 2012, however I have to find my own school by Feb 2012. I am going to start asap of course even though schools have broken up I think it looks keen and ready.
    I have written a couple of applications already and this is what I have included: My GCSEs, degree and A levels - I have also mentioned that I studied A level health and social care which included childhood studies. I have also mentioned my previous voluntary work which included working with less able pupils of year 5 and 6 age within the Government funded programme - Extra Time or Playing for Skills.
    I have also offered to volunteer in the school once or twice a week to help and out and to see whether they like me before I begin the course.
    Is there anything else I should be including in my initial application email?
    Thanks guys. Its all very daunting! x
     
  2. Ok guys,
    I'm applying for a GTP starting Sept 2012, however I have to find my own school by Feb 2012. I am going to start asap of course even though schools have broken up I think it looks keen and ready.
    I have written a couple of applications already and this is what I have included: My GCSEs, degree and A levels - I have also mentioned that I studied A level health and social care which included childhood studies. I have also mentioned my previous voluntary work which included working with less able pupils of year 5 and 6 age within the Government funded programme - Extra Time or Playing for Skills.
    I have also offered to volunteer in the school once or twice a week to help and out and to see whether they like me before I begin the course.
    Is there anything else I should be including in my initial application email?
    Thanks guys. Its all very daunting! x
     
  3. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    Firstly emails can be easily deleted- often by the admin staff. You may find a better response sending a c.v and a short covering letter into schools. That way the lettter can be passed on.If secondary find out the name of the Head of Dept and if primary the name of the Head and address personally. I suggest you send first week of term rather than over the holidays as mail can go astray.You could also check with your EBITTs for details of schools who have undertaken GTP in the past to target these.
    You also need to be realistic about GTP- despite all the hype it is still only 10% of national ITT places and less in some areas.The details of next year's allocation have yet to be finalised but it is likely the lion's share will go to secondary shortage subjects. You should also apply for PGCE.
     
  4. thanks for your reply. I am being realistic but there are two gtp ebitts in my area alone. The only thing about pgce is I don't want to get another loan out to pay for the course. Plus I don't know how I can live on no money as there is no bursary. How does anyone survive?
     
  5. Hi Teacher_Jen
    This is my advice, having been through GTP, for what it is worth. You need to cover you bases and apply for anything and everything. My preferred GTP provider was my local uni and I applied alongside the school where I was already working as a TA. However, I also applied to a consortium where I would have to use one of their schools, a GTP that was based in one school and they worked with partner primary schools and a second Uni GTP programme where they allocated a school to you. I also applied for PGCE at the local uni.
    Initially I was offered a place on the consortium GTP. Not my preferred choice but it meant I had a banker as other unis/providers had different application/interview schedules. I was allocated a school and went to see the head. In the meantime I was invited to a PGCE interview at my local uni and was offered a place. This was going to be easier as it was much closer than the GTP place over a 90 minute drive away so I withdrew from the first GTP offer.
    Finally I was interviewed for GTP at my preferred provider and offered a place, so I was able to withdraw from the PGCE place and complete GTP with my preferred provider in the school I had worked in for the past 2 years. I was lucky (or good - still not sure which LOL) and gained a place. There were 24 places for over 300 applicants. Last year they had more than 800 applicants for the same number of places. A friend of mine, who has a similar amount of experience to me, did not get a place and was asked to go away and do some extra development and told to reapply this year. I also have another friend who took 6 applications for a secondary shortage subject before they gained a place.
    I think it was much easier for me as I already had a working relationship with the school. There were only two applicants on in my cohort who had no working relationship with their school or someone at the school before they started the course and the school had agreed to take them. That is 2 people out of over 300 applicants!
    I think you need to develop a working relationship with a school, especially if they are going to be applying alongside you. I think sending CVs and a covering letter is a start, but when the schools go back you need to knock on some doors and talk to some head teachers. Use contacts that you have - I have already discovered this year that using connections is the best way to move forward.
    Hth
     
  6. What subject are you wanting to teach?

    Also the GTP route (as someone has mentioned above) is hard to get on due to dwindelling numbers due to funding cuts etc.
     

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