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What makes you cry EVERY TIME?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by impulce, May 1, 2012.

  1. For me it is the video of the Harrods lion being reunited with his owners - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WO7L448pbwU
    At precisely 3.45 I just sob every time I see it! Such a beautiful creature and the way he remembers them is proof to any that unbelievable bonds can form between humans and cats. It's just been on The One Show and I had to stop eating my dinner while I sobbed my way through it!
    At risk of spending the whole evening in tears....I wondered what makes others cry every time, no matter how many times before!
     
  2. For me it is the video of the Harrods lion being reunited with his owners - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WO7L448pbwU
    At precisely 3.45 I just sob every time I see it! Such a beautiful creature and the way he remembers them is proof to any that unbelievable bonds can form between humans and cats. It's just been on The One Show and I had to stop eating my dinner while I sobbed my way through it!
    At risk of spending the whole evening in tears....I wondered what makes others cry every time, no matter how many times before!
     
  3. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Yes,the lion reunited with the people is lovely. I always always cry at the scene when Jane Eyre comes back to Mr Rochester and he realises that it's her. It has to be the Orson Wells version.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Every time, even though I've read it repeatedly...

    <b style="font-size:16px;">Tony Steinberg: Brave Seventh Grade Viking Warrior[/b]

    by Taylor Mali

    Have you ever seen a Viking ship made out of popsicle sticks

    and balsa wood? Coils of brown thread for ropes,

    sixteen oars made out of chopsticks, and a red and yellow sail

    made from a ripped piece of a little baby brother&rsquo;s footie pajamas?

    I have.

    He died with his sword in his hand and so went straight to heaven.

    The Vikings often buried their bravest warriors in ships.

    Or set them adrift and on fire, a floating island of flames,

    the soul of the brave warrior rising slowly with the smoke.

    In order to understand life in Scandinavia in the Middle Ages,

    you must understand the construction of the Viking ship.

    So here&rsquo;s what I want the class to do:

    I want you to build me a miniature Viking ship.

    You have a month to complete this assignment.

    You can use whatever materials you want,

    but you must all work together.

    Like warriors.

    These are the projects that I&rsquo;m known for as a history teacher.

    Like the Greek Shield Project.

    Or the Marshmallow Catapult Project.

    Or the Medieval Castle of Chocolate Cake

    (actually, that one was a disaster).

    But there was the Egyptian Pyramid Project.

    Have you ever seen a family of four

    standing around a card table after dinner,

    each one holding one triangular side

    of a miniature cardboard Egyptian pyramid

    until the glue finally dried?

    I haven&rsquo;t either, but Mrs. Steinberg said it took 90 minutes,

    and even with the little brother on one side saying,

    This is a stupid pyramid, Tony!

    If I get Mr. Mali next year, my pyramid

    will be designed in such a way that it will not necessitate

    us standing here for 90 minutes while the glue dries!

    And the Tony on the other side saying,

    Shut up! Shut up, you ***!

    If you let go before the glue dries

    I will disembowel you with your Sony PlayStation!


    It was the best family time they&rsquo;d spent together since Hanukkah.

    He died with his sword in his hand and so went straight to heaven.

    Mr. Mali, if that&rsquo;s true,

    that if you died with your sword in your hand

    you would go straight to Valhalla,

    then if you were, like, an old Viking

    and you were about to die of old age,

    could you keep your sword right by your bed

    so if you ever felt, like, &ldquo;I think I might die of old age!&rdquo;

    you could reach out and grab it?


    If I were a Viking God, I don&rsquo;t think I would fall for that.

    But if I were an old Viking about to die of old age,

    that&rsquo;s exactly what I would do. You&rsquo;re a genius.

    He died with his sword in his hand and so went straight to heaven.

    Tony Steinberg had been missing from school for six weeks

    before we finally found out what was wrong.

    And the 12 boys left whispered the name of the disease

    as if you could catch it from saying it too loud.

    We&rsquo;d been warned. The Middle School Head had come to class

    and said Tony was coming to school on Friday.

    But he&rsquo;s had a rough time.

    The medication he&rsquo;s taking has made all his hair fall out.

    So nobody stare, nobody point, nobody laugh.


    I always said I liked teaching in a private school

    because I could talk about God

    and not be breaking the law.

    And I sure talk about God a lot.

    Yes, in history, of course, that&rsquo;s easy:

    Even the Egyptian Pyramid Project

    is essentially a spiritual exercise.

    But how can you teach math and not believe in a God?

    A God of perfect points and planes,

    surrounded by right angles and arch angels of varying degrees.

    Such a God would not give cancer to seventh grade boy;

    wouldn&rsquo;t make his hair fall out from the chemotherapy.

    Totally bald in a jacket and tie on Friday morning&mdash;

    and I don&rsquo;t just mean Tony Steinberg&mdash;

    not one single boy in my class had hair that day;

    the other 12 had all shaved their heads in solidarity.

    Have you ever seen 13 bald-headed seventh grade boys,

    all pointing at each other, all staring, all laughing?

    I have.

    And it&rsquo;s a beautiful sight.

    And almost as striking as 12 boys

    six weeks later&mdash;now with crew cuts&mdash;

    on a Saturday morning,

    standing outside the synagogue

    with heads bowed, holding hands

    and standing in a circle

    around the smoldering remains

    of a miniature Viking ship,

    which they have set on fire,

    the soul of the brave warrior

    rising slowly with the smoke.

    http://taylormali.com/poems-online/tony-steinberg-brave-seventh-grade-viking-warrior/
     
  5. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    Truly, Madly, Deeply. Every time. And if if I ever explain properly to someone what I most miss about teaching. Every time. (It's doing it now, just thinking about it.)
     
  6. lardylady

    lardylady Star commenter

    I just cried my eyes out watching that on The One Show! I always cry buckets at the scene in friends where Chandler proposes to Monica and I always sob at the end of West Side Story.
     
  7. The Sophie Lancaster film http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qW2ve6_BkRA
    The final scene from Six Feet Under http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3-MJyRUkhs
    The Nightingale and the Rose ( and The Selfish Giant )
    Quite a lot of Jesus Christ Superstar ( last 2 interesting for an atheist...)
    A poem called My Dad Did ... and many more! Nowt beats a good sob
    Oh, and Dancer in the Dark- hard to breathe sort of crying ..



     
  8. tangerinecat

    tangerinecat New commenter

    Pretty much every film ever made. It can get embarrassing in the cinema...
     
  9. The end of Blood Brothers (the musical) is another for me....the shock followed by the emotion leaves me a jibbering wreck, even when I know what is coming.
     
  10. lardylady

    lardylady Star commenter

    Don't forget The happy prince.
     
  11. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    when I open my pay slip
     
  12. The ending in Staying On by Paul Scott
    That bit in TKAM where the reverend says: stand up Miss Jean Louise, your father is passing (sob)
    When Kevin Costner's character meets his father in Fields of Dreams
    When Babe is ill and the farmer sings to him

     
  13. The last sentences of 'Of Mice and Men' and 'To Kill a Mockingbird'. Not so sob-making in the films - but used to well up eg when George shot Lennie. Kids used to sob over the dead dogs!!
     
  14. Waaaaaah!! Tears welling now.
     
  15. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    a swift kick in the nuts

    too much wasabi



     
  16. Yep, that's another one!
     
  17. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    There's a song by Elana James and the Hot Club of Cowtown called 'Hey, Beautiful'. the words are taken straight from the last letter home written by a soldier in Iraq before he died. It was a free download and I only listened to it once, just thinking about it makes me well up.
     
  18. The bit in The Railway Children when Jenny Agutter meets her dad again. The "daddy, my daddy" gets me every time.
    And Bloody by the Golinski Brothers.
     
  19. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    Oh yes. Sobfest films include:
    Truly, Madly, Deeply
    Steel Magnolias
    Terms of Endearment
    Awakenings
    Up
    Any film where any person or animal dies.
    Seren's poem has just made me cry. I found a poem in a magazine from a dog rescue charity once. It was about an abandoned dog starving to death [​IMG]
     

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