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what makes good/bad behaviour?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by nstock88, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I was just wondering if anyone had an oppinion on what actually makes for good or bad behaviour in the classroom. Im currently in my 4th and final year at university studying to be a primary school teacher. Im at the fun stage of writing my dissertation and have chosen the topic of 'how practical investigations in science improve behaviour.' Its really interesting and i would be interested to see other teachers/experts oppinions on what you think 'good' or 'bad' behaviour is as i feel every teacher is different!
    Also, if anyone knows of any good books around the topic maybe you could suggest them, would be helpful!
    thanks

     
  2. Hi,
    I was just wondering if anyone had an oppinion on what actually makes for good or bad behaviour in the classroom. Im currently in my 4th and final year at university studying to be a primary school teacher. Im at the fun stage of writing my dissertation and have chosen the topic of 'how practical investigations in science improve behaviour.' Its really interesting and i would be interested to see other teachers/experts oppinions on what you think 'good' or 'bad' behaviour is as i feel every teacher is different!
    Also, if anyone knows of any good books around the topic maybe you could suggest them, would be helpful!
    thanks

     
  3. Interesting title for your dissertation.
    In my experience (not primary school I admit) when a good science teacher sets a practical it has;
    Strict time limits, clear purpose and the children are required to think and write down their observations or recordings in a table or chart.
    Incompetent science teachers;
    Do not set time limits and the children are allowed to meander along. The act of thinking about and recording ones observations is not explicity encouraged or reinforced during the activity. To the untrained eye it may appear that the students are working but I would question the usefulness of what they are doing here.
    Needless to say the incompetent teacher gets a far easier time with badly behaved children than the good one.
    I would say bad behaviour is any voluntary behaviour that prevents learning from taking place.

     
  4. Obedience/disobedience is key. John Wilson's "Philosophy and Practical Education" has a chapter making this point.
     

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