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What level of behaviour is it reasonable to expect?

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by alexanderosman, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. alexanderosman

    alexanderosman Occasional commenter

    On primary supply.
    Obviously I will follow school behaviour policies, and have a positive approach to each class/day. Planning to take stickers and my prize box and raffle tickets, as well as asking at the start of the day who I can send children with good work to and who to send for if there's a problem.
    What level of behaviour should I be aiming for?
    For example, in my own class I don't let anyone go to the toilet during lesson time (possibly near the end of a session if desperate but wouldn't expect that to happen often. I would expect children to stay in their seats and put their hand up if they needed help/wanted to get up. I would use actions/clapping/a shaker to get attention and expect children to put down everything in their hands, look and listen.
    Are these reasonable expectations? I know it is important to have high expectations, but don't want to be unreasonably strict and end up nagging all day.
     
  2. alexanderosman

    alexanderosman Occasional commenter

    On primary supply.
    Obviously I will follow school behaviour policies, and have a positive approach to each class/day. Planning to take stickers and my prize box and raffle tickets, as well as asking at the start of the day who I can send children with good work to and who to send for if there's a problem.
    What level of behaviour should I be aiming for?
    For example, in my own class I don't let anyone go to the toilet during lesson time (possibly near the end of a session if desperate but wouldn't expect that to happen often. I would expect children to stay in their seats and put their hand up if they needed help/wanted to get up. I would use actions/clapping/a shaker to get attention and expect children to put down everything in their hands, look and listen.
    Are these reasonable expectations? I know it is important to have high expectations, but don't want to be unreasonably strict and end up nagging all day.
     
  3. lrw22

    lrw22 Occasional commenter

    I have always had exactly the same expectations of behaviour doing supply as I have had of a class which is permanently mine. If you set out your expectations quickly and clearly at the beginning of the day you won't have to nag at all and will generally have lovely time and experience the nice side of supply work. [​IMG]
     
  4. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    "What level of behaviour is it reasonable to expect?"
    On supply, and often in a permanent post too, it's not reasonable any more to expect reasonable behaviour from UK pupils!
     
  5. Primary may be different. In secondary, pupils expect to play up for supply teachers. There is no sense of respecting someone because they are an experienced, qualified adult - no, you have to "earn" their respect. In some schools it can take two or more years of full time teaching before the pupils "accept" a new teacher, so what chance has a supply teacher got in one day? In one school a girl boasted to me that if I met her form class during the day "oh. you would be crying..." Even in a local, very good faith school where most of the pupils come from affluent families some Year 10 boys were happy to boast about how they were going to change the reputation of the school, and they were proud to be misbehaving
     
  6. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    yuk!
     
  7. As for the toilet thing. Been doing long term supply in a school and this drives me mad. The Y5/6 class rule is that they get up and go to the loo when they want without asking. They put their name on a wipe clean board at the door. I hate this rule and have adapted to waiting til someone comes back before another goes. I am often corrected when telling a child to sit down or wait til I am finished instructions. The whole water bottle thing has created a load of bottle sucking kids who always need the loo as they can't sip water and guzzle it down after play! With ks1 I let them go as they ask one at a time, they also put their own name on the board as there have been problems with how the toilets are treated so staff need to see who has been. Ks2 I often say ask me again in 5 minutes. As for general behaviour expectations it's tricky. As a permanent teacher I always had great behaviour management etc but now on supply I am struggling. I follow school policy and give out stickers or house points etc but I also use the name on the board after a warning to deal with poor behaviour with the knowledge that they can redeem themselves by the end of the day. As I was on long term I know this was followed up by the class teacher by taking off golden time minutes that week etc but on day to day you never know. I guess you should always have higher expectations than you know will happen and make these clear. I too hate lines of kids following me about.
     
  8. Yes I agree that it differs between KS1 and 2. In most schools where I've taught recently there seems to be an unwritten rule that one boy AND one girl can go at any one time; I allow this with Year 1 but for everyone else I try to restrict it to only one person out of the room at a time. They usually accept that this is my eccentricity. I also refuse "Can I go when she gets back?" I always say "I don't take bookings for the toilet" or "Wait till we've finished [whatever it is] and then if you need to go then, tell me." I find that if the activity is good enough, that's the last you hear of it; if they're bored, then every single child wants the toilet, the water bottle or both. You have to exercise a bit of instinctive judgement -- I've not had anyone wet themselves so far. More generally, I prefer those schools where the kids line up in the yard before coming in. It gives you a chance to meet and greet a few of them, make them line up smartly etc and you can soon see who you will need to keep an eye on. But in a lot of schools it seems to be the fashion to let them all wander in as a noisy rabble, drifting into the classroom as and when they arrive -- much harder to establish that crucial first impact.
     
  9. thequillguy

    thequillguy New commenter

    Whenever we have supply in, I make a point of going into the room and telling the teacher to pass on the names of anyone who is especially well behaved (!) and to put anyone who is particularly difficult. I pop in again about 10 minutes later and ensure that the work and the books are set, and refer to the teacher by name. Makes all the difference.

    Supply staff tend to be keen as hell, and appreciative when the kids do work and behave. The one advice I have is that if you have 2-3 kids who won't shut up at the start of the lesson, is to start the lesson with the proviso that you aren't going to waste the time of the class because 2-3 are rabbiting on. Generally, the cover class will be pleased you've started and will happily enough start the work. If the kids who are talking are well behaved enough to leave the room one at a time for a 'chat', they'll be decent enough to keep in the lesson.

    If you do have a 'chat' outside the room, I would keep it pretty much of the line of 'what should you be doing?' with an emphasis on the modality of the question. If they're clever and willing enough to say 'work' then they're back in. Otherwise you should consider whether to involve another teacher, or whether to move them etc.
     

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