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What kind of digital user are you?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by gailrobinson, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. A leading digital marketing agency claims there are four new distinct personal profiles into which the majority of us fall into when dealing and engaging with technology. They are the Digitally Dominant, the Digitally Deft, the Digitally Deaf and the Digitally Disabled.
    These breakdowns are explained in more detail below, but what do you think and do you fit into any of the categories?
    The Digitally Dominant
    The Digitally Dominant person has fully adopted the digital age but in the process forfeited the pleasures of spoken conversation and human interaction. Whilst only representative of about 16% of the population they are a growing band of people who ‘over indulge' in digital.
    This group run their lives digitally and electronically, eschewing as often as possible any verbal interaction with others. They usually carry at least two mobile devices with them at all time, most often a phone and Tablet. Weekly food shopping is done via the internet. Holidays are booked on the internet too all insurance, applications, plus banking are kept online.
    The Digitally Deft
    Switched on to the digital age this group uses all the digital options at their disposal to try and make a better life for themselves. They make digital work for them yet are not slaves to it.
    They use it for all manner of things and as a primary source of communication. But for every 100 texts they send they will make around ten phone calls, enjoying the sound of a voice and the emotions that it carries. They are more likely to adopt internet phone services like Skype than any other group.
    The greatest users of social networking sites, this group is also three times more likely to watch TV through a Player and watch at a time that suits them, rather than when aired. Around 30% also have a Twitter account.
    The Digitally Deaf
    In a rather counter-revolutionary manner this group seems to relish rebutting the digital advance. Either way the Digitally Deaf are clinging to a bygone era which is unlikely to return but which still holds much merit for them.
    Letters, cards and good old fashion phone calls on a handset attached to the actual mechanics of the phone are favoured by this group over email, internet cards and mobile calls.
    However, the research found that this group is not necessarily old fashioned or even old. 15% of them were under 30 years old and of this 90% were fully conversant with email, the internet and all manner of digital appliances; they just prefer not to use them the whole time.
    They watch television in real time, rarely recording anything and their mobile phone is seldom in need of topping up; they carry it only for emergencies or for friends to call them.
    This group is totally aware and even appreciative of the digital revolution, they just choose to engage with it on their terms and only when absolutely necessary. To them ‘conversation is the window to the mind'.
    The Digitally Disabled
    17% of those interviewed were found to be in this group; made up of those who are being left behind the digital curve but don't want to be. Whilst this group is of a diverse age range, there are still a disproportionate number in the under 25 year old range compared with the other groups.
    Often hindered by the lack of confidence in and conviction of their abilities this group becomes a self-perpetuating one.
    Of those within this group 42% have not sought assistance to master digital because they believe they will be perceived as less capable. Whilst the majority found their phones easy to use, they tended to struggle with internet shopping, booking of tickets online, navigating sites and downloading content such as music and films.
    Frustrated by many of their experiences this group is finding itself left behind

     
  2. A leading digital marketing agency claims there are four new distinct personal profiles into which the majority of us fall into when dealing and engaging with technology. They are the Digitally Dominant, the Digitally Deft, the Digitally Deaf and the Digitally Disabled.
    These breakdowns are explained in more detail below, but what do you think and do you fit into any of the categories?
    The Digitally Dominant
    The Digitally Dominant person has fully adopted the digital age but in the process forfeited the pleasures of spoken conversation and human interaction. Whilst only representative of about 16% of the population they are a growing band of people who ‘over indulge' in digital.
    This group run their lives digitally and electronically, eschewing as often as possible any verbal interaction with others. They usually carry at least two mobile devices with them at all time, most often a phone and Tablet. Weekly food shopping is done via the internet. Holidays are booked on the internet too all insurance, applications, plus banking are kept online.
    The Digitally Deft
    Switched on to the digital age this group uses all the digital options at their disposal to try and make a better life for themselves. They make digital work for them yet are not slaves to it.
    They use it for all manner of things and as a primary source of communication. But for every 100 texts they send they will make around ten phone calls, enjoying the sound of a voice and the emotions that it carries. They are more likely to adopt internet phone services like Skype than any other group.
    The greatest users of social networking sites, this group is also three times more likely to watch TV through a Player and watch at a time that suits them, rather than when aired. Around 30% also have a Twitter account.
    The Digitally Deaf
    In a rather counter-revolutionary manner this group seems to relish rebutting the digital advance. Either way the Digitally Deaf are clinging to a bygone era which is unlikely to return but which still holds much merit for them.
    Letters, cards and good old fashion phone calls on a handset attached to the actual mechanics of the phone are favoured by this group over email, internet cards and mobile calls.
    However, the research found that this group is not necessarily old fashioned or even old. 15% of them were under 30 years old and of this 90% were fully conversant with email, the internet and all manner of digital appliances; they just prefer not to use them the whole time.
    They watch television in real time, rarely recording anything and their mobile phone is seldom in need of topping up; they carry it only for emergencies or for friends to call them.
    This group is totally aware and even appreciative of the digital revolution, they just choose to engage with it on their terms and only when absolutely necessary. To them ‘conversation is the window to the mind'.
    The Digitally Disabled
    17% of those interviewed were found to be in this group; made up of those who are being left behind the digital curve but don't want to be. Whilst this group is of a diverse age range, there are still a disproportionate number in the under 25 year old range compared with the other groups.
    Often hindered by the lack of confidence in and conviction of their abilities this group becomes a self-perpetuating one.
    Of those within this group 42% have not sought assistance to master digital because they believe they will be perceived as less capable. Whilst the majority found their phones easy to use, they tended to struggle with internet shopping, booking of tickets online, navigating sites and downloading content such as music and films.
    Frustrated by many of their experiences this group is finding itself left behind

     
  3. I am the Queen of the Kingdom of the Digitally Dominant..
     
  4. Somehow I find this statement slightly arousing.


    Sorry.
     
  5. Well now you come to mention it, I can see what you mean[​IMG]
     
  6. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

    Get a (private chat) room you two!
     
  7. tonyuk

    tonyuk Occasional commenter

    I am digitally discombobulated!
     
  8. No need for that - I experienced a sense of arousal and intimidation at the same time.
     
  9. colpee

    colpee Star commenter

    Seems like a rebadging of the 'Adopter' terminology so loved by marketting people to describe slow take up of their products. I (like most people I suspect) fit none of the categories paricularly well, and company directors will probably yawn and remark sarcastically on the new excuse before advertising for a new head of marketting.
     
  10. How offensive are the titles that this digital marketing group have come up with "The Digatally Deaf" and "The Digitally Disabled". Why is it necessary to be so offensive and on an educational site too you should know better TES
     
  11. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I'm definitely digitally hearing-impaired as opposed to having a digital disability.
     
  12. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    Erm, none of the above. As much as I'm mired in technology, I underutilise my iPhone and refuse to buy any sort of tablet. I don't do food shopping online, but I buy most other things that way.
    (On the other hand I have a laptop and a powerful gaming PC)
    I'm a digital sceptic - I'll use it, but I have to be convinced that it's worth it.
     
  13. Exactly how is this offensive?



    What utter bloody nonsense.
     
  14. As entitled to your opinion as you are, my point was why is it always neccessary for the negative categorisation to be associated with a marginalised group. It is easy to have the view that this is a bit of fun, toungue in cheek but it only goes further to discriminate and poorly educated people that poking fun is ok to do. Those with a disability spend their lives being the butt of others joke TES should know better.
     
  15. Yup. And you're intellectually challenged.
     

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