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What is the most recognised qualification to be a TA

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by rattyg, May 29, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I'm currently working full time in a school as an LSA but want to get some TA qualifications. I'm confused about what is the most recognised qualification at the moment . I can't find a local college that does NVQ's anymore only BTEC or City & Guilds.I really want a course i can do in the evenings to enable me to keep working full time.
    Can anyone advise,
    Sarah
     
  2. Hi,
    I'm currently working full time in a school as an LSA but want to get some TA qualifications. I'm confused about what is the most recognised qualification at the moment . I can't find a local college that does NVQ's anymore only BTEC or City & Guilds.I really want a course i can do in the evenings to enable me to keep working full time.
    Can anyone advise,
    Sarah
     
  3. tamtams

    tamtams New commenter

    Hi, cache level 3 for Ta's would be your best bet.
     
  4. picsgirl

    picsgirl New commenter

    Hi,
    NVQ and technical certificates are being phased out and replayed by QCF qualifications which combine the two. Most of these are through an apprenticeships. Cache, BTEC and C& G are just the provider name, the qualification will be the same.
    You may still be able to find a college that offers the technical course but I know in the area I live a stand alone NVQ is no longer available.
    Have you asked your school as the local authority may run some courses.
    I'm currently doing the QCF via my school, it's one evening per week plus 10-20 hours per week of course work.
     
  5. Thanks for your advice.
     
  6. Thankyou, I'll ask at school . you've made a lot clearer.
     
  7. Hi
    Im currently studying the NCFE Level 2 Supporting teaching in schools qualification.
    It is one day in college and then over the year you are expected to do in the region of 80 hours in a placement.
    I have received assurances from the school where I am currently doing my placement that this qualification is recognised and will enable me to gain employment.

     
  8. Thanks. Train to Gain is for people who do not have GCSE Maths or English, I believe. Maybe the reason none of us at the school I work in are offered NVQs etc is because we are too qualified already. I have a degree, so I've had my bite at the cherry. I'd better get saving!
     
  9. picsgirl

    picsgirl New commenter

    The QCF apprenticeship that I'm doing is funded by the Welsh Assembly, but this not always the case- it depends on existing qualifications and I this funding is stopping soon.
    I found an online compaby that offers it and it's cost £1600 for the course plus you have to pay for someone to come in and assess you (unless the schools does it) which would be a few more hundred ounds.
    If I want to go on to do the Level 3 technical certificate at the local college, it's £450 .
     
  10. I did an Open University course last year, E111- Supporting Learning in Primary Schools. Very useful, as it is a stand-alone certificate, or 60 credits towards foundation degree / BA or Diploma.

    It cost about £600 and needs about 12 hours per week for reading and studying online resources. You need a placement in a school, as there are 6 essays to write during the nine months, often about an activity or observation you have done with the children.

    It is a good starting point, a Level 4 qualification that is easily obtainable, and it got me my job!
     
  11. Oh! If it's your first Open Uni course, you can use Tesco Clubcard vouchers to pay for it too!
     
  12. I have an NVQ level in Supporting Teaching and Learning as well as just completing a Level 3 Diploma in Specialist Support for Teaching and Learning in Schools both of which are City and Guilds. I have friends that have compeleted the CACHE equivalent. I suggest contacting your LEA and ask which ones they recognise. I am hopefully going to study a Foundation Degree in Supporting Teaching and Learning in Schools in September if I have passed my Level 3 which can lead to HLTA status once I have passed. Hope this helps. My level 3 is the new City and Guilds Qualification.
     
  13. Train to gain is a special scheme for TA's who got less than 5 GCSE's rather than TA's who didn't get GCSE in Maths and English. I came from an era where there weren't any GCSE's it was then CSE's and O'levels. I have a good knowledge of Numeracy and English and got O'level in English and French but didn't quite get the 5 qualifications. I have since gained my NVQ 2 in Supporting Teaching and Learning and Level 3 and seriously considering doing a foundation degree in Early years. I found the Train to Gain programme incredibly beneficial to myself and I'm sure TA's like me who didn't get a bite of the cherry will find it equally beneficial. It's a shame the Train to Gain incentive is slowly being phased out!!
     
  14. picsgirl

    picsgirl New commenter

    I just googled Train To Gain - it's only available in England plus the scheme finishes on 31/7.
     

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