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What is it like working in a PRU?

Discussion in 'Professional development' started by AC2, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. AC2

    AC2

    I'm in my notice period at my current school and about to move to another part of the country (no choice on that one). I've not yet found a (secondary) schoolon the other end and I've suddenly found myself considering something I'd not thought of yet... Maybe I'm suited to work in a Pupil Referral Unit school.
    What could I expect from working in a PRU school?
     
  2. AC2

    AC2

    I'm in my notice period at my current school and about to move to another part of the country (no choice on that one). I've not yet found a (secondary) schoolon the other end and I've suddenly found myself considering something I'd not thought of yet... Maybe I'm suited to work in a Pupil Referral Unit school.
    What could I expect from working in a PRU school?
     
  3. Hey there,
    You might get a better response if you posted on personal. Another poster asked this question a few weeks ago there and got some very good replies. If you'd like to chat I'm happy tp PM and correspond through the inbox.
    Melonballs.
     
  4. Hello, I have been working in a PRU for 4 years and have just made the decision to go back to mainstream. Working in a PRU you need to forget about your ego and never take anything personally. You are working with, and supporting very damaged children who need surroundings that are predictable, reliable, consistant and calm. Behaviour management is all about de-escalating behaviours. Never underestimate the new student. What you see is not what you are going to get! You need to have unlimited patience. You will be verbally abused on a daily basis. You will plan exciting stimulating units of work,and lessons, just to find that the couple of students who manage to turn up to class are more interested in social aspects or sleeping things off.
    The Upside is that you get to build close relationships with very special children because of the small numbers. The kids really appreciate staff in PRU's because the staff listen and respect them. You will learn a lot about 'How not to teach'. Day to day life is very unpredictable and never boring. You might spend your lesson wandering around the school looking for your students who didn't come to class. (Nice if it is a sunny warm day and good to be out of doors). It is an ideal job for a creative 'off the cuff' teacher because you are constantly challenged to be flexible and discover new inroads into teaching and learning experiences. You will often have to abandon lesson plans and make quick responses and bend with the group or individual. The biggest reward is when you occassionally feel you had a successful lesson or that you got through to one individual, or maybe even a student coming up and thanking you for being so patient with them or taking time. (Rare but occassional).
    I think teaching in a PRU is an amazing and enlightening experience. I am now ready to go back to mainstream to implement some of the knowledge and experiences I have gained from working in that envoironment.
    What part of the country are you moving to? I am south east.
     
  5. frankieneedssomesunshine

    frankieneedssomesunshine New commenter

    Hi Artaway. I thoroughly agreed with your post and was wondering how its going in mainstream? Im thinking of doing the same but I dont know whether its a step backward. Thanks.
     

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