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What happens to hts and slt?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by install, Dec 19, 2019.

  1. install

    install Star commenter

    How is it that some hts and slt suddenly change and lose all interest in actual teaching once they gain their new role? Some switch Unions overnight. Others start to criticize teachers and the progress of challenging classes where once they may have offered to support a lesson once a week.

    So - why the gleeful, critical and sudden change of allegiance? And why the new complete distaste of all teachers and their opinions?
     
  2. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    They are quite often the one who never had all that much interest in actual teaching to begin with, nor any particular aptitude for it.

    otherwise they wouldn't be in such a rush to leave it behind.
     
  3. install

    install Star commenter

    Thank you. I agree in part.

    In my experience it has been the ones who have not served a long time at the chalk face. Or even been those who have failed to get results. It all seems odd imho.
     
    towncryer and needabreak like this.
  4. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Not all.

    I am retired now but as HT in four separate schools I have always timetabled myself to do some teaching, even if only a handful of lessons each week. I did this even in the largest school at which I was head - 600+ pupils.

    It means I had to prepare lessons, teach, maintain good pupil behaviour, mark work, write reports for parents and have my own teaching watched by Ofsted.

    In other words, making sure I did what I was expecting other teachers to do in order to keep my expectations reasonable and be able to demonstrate good practice rather than just refer to it.

    Best way, for me, was teaching DT resistant materials on a carousel basis so I got to teach every pupil in the school, even if only for half a term.

    All HTs should teach - stops them getting above themselves!

    Sensible move, actually.
     
  5. install

    install Star commenter

    Thank you.

    In my experience, you are a rare find these days. Too many hts and members of slt rarely teach or support challenging classes these days. Many seem to inhabit password coded corridors that few can enter.

    Hts, Deputies and Assistant Heads do not teach challenging classes in some schools now. And that is a concern imho. As for changing Unions - it is a great pity that Hts, slt and teachers are not part of one Union.
     
  6. Jamvic

    Jamvic Star commenter

    Difficult one that...


    So Debbie, what first attracted you to the millionaire Paul Daniels?

    704CC328-1DCF-408F-9AA4-51BD14FC8D0A.jpeg
     
  7. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    I'm sorry if that's true now. I had many inspiring headteachers who would go into classes to support teachers; they didn't necessarily assume that a badly-behaved class meant that the teacher was doing something wrong, any more than you would assume a nurse was bad at her/his job if a patient was swearing at her in hospital. They sat and had lunch with us in the school dining hall and talked about school-or about what you'd done at the weekend! They taught a few classes themselves, and sometimes muttered that although they enjoyed the important challenge of leading, they occasionally missed being in the classroom all week. They organised staff nights out, and might have danced on the tables once or twice! These things all happened in 'average' state schools this century; I'm not talking about 50s indies.Please tell me that there are still some like this...
     
  8. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Probably best to have different unions when there are teacher vs HT disputes. It avoids one union being accused of "taking sides".

    Best part of the week was Friday afternoon when I would escape to the Reception classrooms and read them a story!
     
  9. install

    install Star commenter

    Money talks ...
     
    needabreak, Jamvic and nomad like this.
  10. Jamvic

    Jamvic Star commenter

    To be fair I think the thread title should read.

    What happens to SOME hts and slt?


    I’ve worked with some really good H/T’s and SLT’s who still taught and always tried to be decent & fair with staff.

    However, I’ve also suffered the other type too, the ones who definitely fulfil the Peter Principle.

    The latter would sneer at the idea of having to do anything so lowly as actually teach, would regularly abuse the power they held and were generally not very nice as individuals (that’s a euphemism for nasty minded, sociopathic, bullies btw).

    Many of this type definitely looked upon any post they obtained and the people they worked with as just transient career stepping stones on their personal pathways to (whatever they perceived as) the top.
     
  11. install

    install Star commenter

    Thank you. I agree. It should say 'some'. I am sure there are some hts and slt out there who:

    1 Support for a full hour and help teachers who have challenging classes;
    2 Offer to deal with the students who swear and shout out and try to ruin lessons;
    3 See the child unsupported in a class of 30 ( due to lack of funds) who cannot read a simple word;
    4 Accept that teachers should be able to teach without interruptions;
    5 Understand that teachers should have a work life balance and actually earn far less than them.

    Where some hts /slt are -only we know I guess. In my experience, they are not in classrooms ..
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2019
    agathamorse, Jamvic and nomad like this.
  12. Skeoch

    Skeoch Lead commenter

    I've worked closely with two HTs who both wanted to teach. We tried all sorts of approaches but couldn't guarantee that they would always be available when timetabled - while good diary management helped (with support from HT's PA), too many emergencies, special events and so on kept interrupting and we abandoned the attempt. We did have both involved in sports coaching, where there was a bit more flexibility to cover unexpected absence.
     
  13. install

    install Star commenter

    And teaching - the aim of schools - was deemed to be of no importance by weak hts....
     
  14. moscowbore

    moscowbore Star commenter

    I agree that not all senior management forget what a teacher is as soon as they get the title. In 20 years as a teacher I have known one good senior manager. One.

    I once had a chat with a newly promoted young woman. Late twenties and promoted to senior manager of something. I rarely care what managers are called. She came unannounced into the middle of my lesson and started to talk to students as I was explaining something at the board. I asked her not to interrupt the lesson. She did respect my request but with a face like thunder. After the lesson she asked to speak to me and slowly dramatically closed the classroom door. Probably the only time that door was ever closed. She then had a 5 minute rant about stuff. She was slightly flushed and out of breath at the end of it. I asked if I was allowed to retort. She gave me permission. I simply pointed out the printout above my desk which contained my last set of gcse results. 74% A or A*. I asked her for her last set of gcse results. She did not have any. I then pointed out that being appointed manager does not immediately bequeath superpowers and maybe at such a young age she would do well to observe and learn from seasoned successful practitioners. She stormed out of my room and never spoke to me again.
    This is typical of my experience of senior school management.
     
  15. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    I've worked with the decent, the deceitful and the downright dangerous.

    The latter I remember most because they made a negative impact... the former I struggle to remember because them doing their job well really just meant that my job went smoothly.

    Some people remove the obstacles... others place new obstacles in your way... and some... they just are the obstacle.
     
  16. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    "The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see its a rse" is a northern expression that sums it up in many cases.

    When I was a union rep I made a particular point of asking the HT's chief lackey how many cover lessons the HT had done each year, to ensure it was being shared equitably across all staff. No comment.
     
  17. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    [Edit] Double post, sorry.
     
  18. davidmu

    davidmu Occasional commenter

    I think this post is rather one sided. I was SLT and taught 29 out of 35 periods each week. My timetable covered all abilities from Upper Sixth to very low ability year nines in a state 13-18 comp. teaching Mathematics. One of my many tasks was to allocate cover and a register was displayed so that colleagues could observe the distribution. Sensible colleagues understood that it was impossible to arrange perfect allocation but they appreciated the effort made. I was on the premises from 8am to at least 5pm each day and frequently later. I was also Examination Secretary for 20 years in a comp. of 1500 pupils. These days this role is a fulltime admin. post. Some of you have no idea how hard SLT work!
     
  19. geraldbeattie

    geraldbeattie New commenter

    Perhaps some of the great and the good demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect, where people assess their own ability as greater than it actually is and comes from their inability to recognise their lack of ability. Over the years I have had several good manager who really cared about their staff and students. However, these were outnumbered by at least three to one by those who were only interested in their own self promotion and viewed any problems, both in the classroom and in the college as a whole, as entirely down to overworked teaching staff not fully buying in to their latest fad craze and working 60 plus hours a week to produce ridiculous amounts of evidence.
     
    Jamvic and install like this.
  20. install

    install Star commenter

    I think you have hit the nail on the head. There seems to be an assumption with some hts/slt that their post entitled them to be speak and to be spoken to in a certain way. And imho it does not - at least if schools want to function as a team.
     
    Jamvic likes this.

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