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What figure of speech???

Discussion in 'English' started by Facetious, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. A metaphor. Although 'buttery' only really means 'butter-like' which is edging on simile. I'd still go with metaphor though.
     
  2. knitone

    knitone Senior commenter

    It is a metaphor. If it were written as a simile, it would be 'the sunshine was a yellow as butter.' A metaphor goes a stage further and instead of just comparing one thing with another, it actually describes something as if it were something else. The example I always give my students is 'You're as cold as ice' (cue class rendition of Foreigner song) and 'Your hands are a blocks of ice.'
    Hopes this helps.
     
  3. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    The same sort as chocolatey voice or velvety cream, I suppose. An adjective used to describe something literally unconnected? Does such a figure of speech have a particular name? Am I any the worse off for not knowing what it is, if it does?
    Why do you need to know? Mr inky and I tend to have language spats on Sunday mornings.
    x
     
  4. knitone

    knitone Senior commenter

    As well as wanting to get rid of the superfluous 'a' in my post, I agree with Facetious.[​IMG]
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I don't agree that it's a metaphor. The y on the end butter denotes nothing more than similarity.
     
  6. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Maybe buttery is a metaphorical adjective but the phrase itself isn't a metaphor.
     
  7. knitone

    knitone Senior commenter

    Hmmm. Now I agree with Inky -
    But I still feel that there is some justification for saying metaphor...
     
  8. Thanks a lot people - I decided it was a metaphor yesterday, but then doubted myself today - a wee bit of 'wine flu' I suspect. It's for a Close Reading passage I am putting together...
     
  9. knitone

    knitone Senior commenter

    'Metaphorical adjective' - like it!
     
  10. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Surely the most it can be is a simile, since it's saying that the sunshine is like butter in softness and colour?
     
  11. "The sun was directly overhead, filling the circle with a haze of buttery sunshine"

    But it is saying the sunshine is buttery, not like butter - I'm getting confused again!
     
  12. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Saying that the sunshine was buttery is the same as saying that the sunshine was like butter.
     
  13. knitone

    knitone Senior commenter

    I suppose it depends whether you take 'buttery' to mean 'like butter' or covered in butter. This is one of the reasons teaching English is so interesting.
     
  14. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    = butter-like

    definitely not a metaphor!
     
  15. I do like the metaphorical adjective suggestion. To be a true metaphor it would be saying ' the ball of butter in the sky' and suggesting it really is that thing. However that bloomin' 'y' on the end, like Inky says, suggests it is only <u>like</u> that, which is why I felt it had essence of simile emanating from it. Perhaps there really isn't a term for this. Where's David Crystal when you need him?
     
  16. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I rather hope there isn't. It was bad enough doing a lesson on personification with a Yr 3 class recently.
     
  17. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Yikes!

    Who's David Crystal?
     
  18. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Now I know why I went into primary teaching all those years ago...
     
  19. http://david-crystal.blogspot.com/
     
  20. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Ta. When all's said and done, buttery is just an adjective.
     

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