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What exactly is 0.6 part-time?

Discussion in 'Part-time and job share' started by jonathan_white, Nov 2, 2016.

  1. jonathan_white

    jonathan_white New commenter

    Salary-wise, I get it - whatever I'd get if I worked full time multiplied by 0.6 but the practicalities of it all are not clear to me.

    Would I work 3 days out of 5 (3/5=0.6) or would I work 5 days a week leaving after having worked 60% of each day?

    Are all of my obligations also 60% or are there some "hidden" responsibilities?

    Would I also do marking only 60% of the time? What about Parent's evenings? What about school trips? What about CPD? What about PPA?
     
  2. blue451

    blue451 Established commenter

    Could be either or could be a mixture of the two, it depends on the specifics of the post and the timetabling. You could find yourself for example working 2 full days and two 0.5 days.

    All of your obligations should also be based on the 60% although that of course is complicated where the extras come in and some discussion/negotiation may be necessary. As I understand it, if you don't work Mondays, you don't work Mondays, regardless of parents evenings, meetings, inset and so on, but I may be wrong on that.
     
  3. blue451

    blue451 Established commenter

    Could be either or could be a mixture of the two, it depends on the specifics of the post and the timetabling. You could find yourself for example working 2 full days and two 0.5 days.

    All of your obligations should also be based on the 60% although that of course is complicated where the extras come in and some discussion/negotiation may be necessary. As I understand it, if you don't work Mondays, you don't work Mondays, regardless of parents evenings, meetings, inset and so on, but I may be wrong on that.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  4. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    The 0.6 is worked out on the basis of how much teaching+PPA you have compared to a full-time teacher. Assemblies, duties, etc do not count in working out whether it's 0.6 or 0.65 or what.

    Your directed time is then 0.6 x 1265, so you can't be directed to work for more than those hours. You also cannot be directed to work on a day when you have no teaching. You don't have to do 0.6 of each individual component that makes up the normal workload; depending on your days, you might do all parents evenings and none of the after-school meetings. You would do inset days which fall when you would normally be in school. (You can agree to vary that - but you can't be forced to. Sometimes it's easier to attend the parents' evening than to follow up queries afterwards, for instance. Schools are often willing to pay you to attend an inset day that falls on your day off, if you choose to attend.)

    You would do all relevant marking; if you're only teaching 0.6 of the time, then that will normally be about 0.6 of a normal load, but not always - if you're teaching all GCSE classes, or all maths/English in primary, for instance.

    As for how the teaching is distributed, that varies. Particularly in primary, it may be three days - sharing a class with another part-timer or someone with whole-school responsibilities. It might be mornings only - enabling there to be an extra class for maths and English. Or it might be PPA cover - which might vary in how it is distributed (but there might be more flexibility on how this is arranged).

    In secondary, again, you might share a timetable with another part-timer, but often there is an effort to avoid too many classes being split between two teachers, and so it might be that what they really want is someone who can teach a timetable spread across 4 or even 5 days. I quite liked that sort of contract, as I had my own groups and full responsibility for them, but it's no use if you have pre-school childcare to arrange. Some schools have fortnightly timetables, so that the pattern may not even be the same every week. Some timetablers make a high priority of catering for their part-timers, but it can be tricky, especially for some subjects. If you have a "bitty" timetable, it shouldn't really have gaps of "trapped time" in it when you are not paid.

    You need to ask about the distribution and get it in writing. If you have a contract that just says 0.6, then the school could change it from year to year, and some don't even give reasonable notice. If you're starting a job mid-year, you'll probably see the timetable at interview, but don't assume that because it's Mon-Weds this year, it will be Mon-Weds next September. If the days of the week matter to you, try to get them in the contract. If the days don't matter, but they do need to be three full days, then make sure the contract says 0.6 across three days.
     
    emerald52 and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  5. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Excellent summary by frustrum above,

    O.6 can basically mean whatever the school wants it to be. I've known one colleague who just has periods 2 & 5 on a Monday for example to count as one of the half days. means they have to be in school all day but only paid for 2 periods. Rest of the week isn't quite as bad but it is spread over 4 days.
     
  6. jonathan_white

    jonathan_white New commenter

    Thanks all for your help.

    It looks like it all boils down to how well you can sell yourself and how badly they need you.

    After having worked full time for a half-term and not getting any sleep except on "zombie Saturdays" I think 0.6 would be optimal for me. Having read everything here, I prefer 3 full days to a week of five 0.6 days since that would mean more sleep, less aggravation, more time for tutoring, more opportunities for tourism. Ideally, it would be on 3 consecutive days, but the next best thing would be to have either Monday or Friday off.
     
  7. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    I went part-time for work-life balance reasons (no kids), and I liked it much better. I actually came to the conclusion that I preferred my timetable spread across the whole week, rather than have any five period days. I could get marking done in any gaps, leaving me with little to take home, and it was easier for the school to timetable.
     
    gingerhobo48 and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  8. emerald52

    emerald52 Star commenter

    Just remember that part time work means you miss out on pension as for 0.6 you will only accrue 0.6 of a pension year.
     
  9. jonathan_white

    jonathan_white New commenter

    That goes without saying ;)
     
    emerald52 likes this.
  10. emerald52

    emerald52 Star commenter

    You would think so however I have heard several teachers be surprised that their part time service knocks down the accrued years, To them a year of teaching is a year despite being part time.
     
  11. jonathan_white

    jonathan_white New commenter

    :eek::eek::eek:

    Now that's just sad, and if they're Maths teachers, that's also dangerous
     
    emerald52 likes this.
  12. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    I've come across a different misconception, which is that if you work 0.6, your pension is based on your 0.6 salary. It isn't; it's based on the full-time equivalent, otherwise you'd be getting 0.6 of 0.6, which would be 0.36 and most unfair!
     
    Steph2002, gingerhobo48 and emerald52 like this.
  13. Violalass

    Violalass New commenter

    I didn't ask for 0.6, I asked for and got three full days a week. I was careful to be specific about what was negotiable (which days) and what was not. I do parents' evenings because I wouldn't like not to but the school have never pushed me. I have also gone in for extra CPD days but taken time off in lieu e.g. skipped church services (an excellent deal in my view).
     

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