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What does an outstanding lesson look like?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Ezzie, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. Ezzie

    Ezzie Occasional commenter

    Just worked my butt off for Osfted inspection. Felt really positive, children engaged and enjoying the LIteracy lesson I was observed in. Yet inspector could only manage a satisfactory. I don't know what else I can do - feeling really ****. As a school we have to have all good lessons with some outstanding but what do I need to do? Is it really possible to make every lesson a 'good' one and still have a life? Asked Head to come into my class and show me what an outstanding lesson looks like but got short shrift. Why do Ofsted always make you feel like you should be looking for another job.....
     
  2. Ezzie

    Ezzie Occasional commenter

    Just worked my butt off for Osfted inspection. Felt really positive, children engaged and enjoying the LIteracy lesson I was observed in. Yet inspector could only manage a satisfactory. I don't know what else I can do - feeling really ****. As a school we have to have all good lessons with some outstanding but what do I need to do? Is it really possible to make every lesson a 'good' one and still have a life? Asked Head to come into my class and show me what an outstanding lesson looks like but got short shrift. Why do Ofsted always make you feel like you should be looking for another job.....
     
  3. No it's not possible to make every lesson outstanding, interactive, inspirational, etc. and still have a life.

    From Ofsted's perspective, an outstanding lesson is engaging, sharply focused, contextualised and interactive in someway - in its nature. From my perspective, an outstanding lesson effectively challenges children to maximise learning as far as possible (considering the circumstances) whether or not I choose to teach sitting down or scratching my **** and standing up.
     
  4. If you've been given a grade by Ofsted then they should have given you some feedback as to why that was the grade and points to improve.
    My school was 'done' in December and my English lesson observed. They key thing that made it outstanding was not the delivery or wowness (it wasn't in anyway an all singing all dancing lesson) but the progress the children made. They had differentiated objectives, knew what these were and how to achieve them, self assessed during the lesson against the objectives (leading me to help some and extend others) and could tell the inspector exactly what their targets for improvement were. At the end of the lesson they could all say whether they had met, partially met or not achieved. No one had 'not achieved'.
    The feedback from the inspector was that this was clearly what happened all the time, it wasn't a one off, the children knew how to self assess and extend and were clearly comfortable doing so. In other words the lesson wasn't a one off show.
    The focus really has changed from teachers delivering to pupils learning and improving.
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I had the same problem in November...drives me mad.

    Lots of lovely sympathetic advice on here:
    http://community.tes.co.uk/forums/t/537461.aspx?PageIndex=1
     
  6. I know what you mean. Too often we are told we are not good enough, yet are never given the opportunity to actually SEE an outstanding lesson being delivered.
     
  7. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Have a look at your payslip at the end of the month. If the numbers next to the pound sign in the box at the bottom are the same as they usually are, then just carry on as normal.
     
  8. This sounds great and very useful advice.
    I'm interested, though, in which year group. I teach KS1 (currently Year 2). Many of my children, even at a very basic level, would struggle to understand much less express whether they had achieved LO etc, or explain how they could improve. Having several differentiated objectives in a lesson for low ability (generally), young children at the very earliest stages of their learning would take most of the lesson to explain let alone deliver.
    Is it easier (I use that term loosely!!) to achieve / demonstrate outstanding teaching in KS2 than KS1?
     
  9. YOU felt good, YOU know your children. Nuff said. I hope you feel better soon when you reflect on the reality of what just happened. Someone has come into your class, not familiar with you, your children, your school and made a judgement based on minutes (not HOURS or days but minutes) of observation. It's not realistic. They have an agenda.
    Chin up!
     
  10. Know the feeling. SMT "dropped in" totally unannounced last week. I thought I had lucked in as they observed, motivated, enthusiastic kids, who were really getting into what we were doing. They all made progress with the objective. It was interactive, they had a chance to self assess their progress etc etc. The objective of the lesson was clear to them and visible for the world to see.etc etc... And it just so happened that I had addressed all the points for improvement in my last "drop in" observed lesson.
    So, I was expecting decent feedback today.
    Do you think I got it? Nope.
    Seriously p'd off. Spent all Friday night and all day Saturday, till nearly midnight planning and jumping through hoops. New format for MT planning, new target system to sort out, new guided reading system (with pre and post reading tasks and questions for AFs) to sort out. Oh and spent my entire PPA this afternoon sorting out 2 displays... word of thanks? Or even noticing that I had done my hoop jumping as well? What do you think?
    This job doesn't pay enough for the hours I am putting in.
     
  11. [​IMG] Blame Dr. Marzano and his research company for all of this.
     
  12. Good for you! You should be very proud of your achievements, sounds like you've struck a good balance between meeting the children's needs and pandering to the miriad of new initiatives swamping us at all times. Your children are achieving because you have put their needs first and the inspectors recognised this. Keep it up! [​IMG]
     
  13. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    LOL my year 2 class love having their turn on the writing table, meaning the have access to gel pens and fibre-tips and pens with feathers on the ends. Hey I need to buy such things each summer and so my class have to like using them! Sad, but true.

    I do believe you and feel very glad that their ofsted inspectors out there who have such a sensible view of teaching/learning, but can I also do a sulky adolescent 'because it isn't fair' kind of response? I did a maths lesson like that, data for my class shows better than good progress over time (as did last year's in year 6) and yet the inspector still said it was **** because children didn't make progress in the small amount of the lesson she saw! Well she actually said satisfactory, but same thing. Apparently individual whiteboards in the mental starter would have made all the difference!
     
  14. Sometimes my children achieve more by actually watching/concentrating/contributing that using whiteboads and pens because I have to spend so much of my time telling them to STOP DRAWING PICTURES.
     
  15. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Ahhh but if your observer sits herself behind them, she then says "they just sat there" No they flippin didn't! Did you not see the forest of hands up> (oooops shouldn't have done that either!)

    Aggghhh I'm just tired and slightly tiddly. It wasn't an outstanding lesson, I've taught many better ones, but it wasn't the useless mess she said either!

    Being a school with an ethos among staff of wanting to be outstanding, a school where progress for longer than I've been in my current one is excellent and a little bit of luck helps massively.
     
  16. I do feel your pain minniemix. In a previous inspection I was told that a lesson could only be good because I didn't give the children a choice of different papers to write on. Reading that back I actually do wish I was joking.
     
  17. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    LOLOLOL Mad....

    Mine often do have that choice, but I don't feel that it is a key difference between good and outstanding!
     
  18. Which year group was this please?
     
  19. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    This happened to me too. Soooo frustrating and meaningless.
     

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