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what does a typical morning look like in your reception class?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by sezzpetts, Nov 11, 2010.

  1. I am a supply teacher and I am amazed at how differently schools have interpreted the EYFS. Some reception classes that I go in are very formal and the teacher dictates exactly where the children are to go and what activities they are to complete and others are much more free-range, with children wandering round to where ever they want to.
    I may have the possibilty of a contract in a reception class for a couple of terms and feel uncertain about how child-led or how teacher-led it should be. That is why I am interested to know what your reception class looks like on a typical morning - is it wrong to be formal and structured in a reception class? But if children are going where ever they want to, how do you keep track of what they are or are not doing?
     
  2. I am a supply teacher and I am amazed at how differently schools have interpreted the EYFS. Some reception classes that I go in are very formal and the teacher dictates exactly where the children are to go and what activities they are to complete and others are much more free-range, with children wandering round to where ever they want to.
    I may have the possibilty of a contract in a reception class for a couple of terms and feel uncertain about how child-led or how teacher-led it should be. That is why I am interested to know what your reception class looks like on a typical morning - is it wrong to be formal and structured in a reception class? But if children are going where ever they want to, how do you keep track of what they are or are not doing?
     
  3. The reception class in the school I am working in is very free flowing, and at times feels like a nursery class. I have also worked years ago as a TA in a reception class where there would be a CLL 'lesson' (an example - teacher reads 3 Billy Goats and after discussion etc on carpet, children would go to tables and do activities related to that story such as story sequencing with the TA, building a bridge from construction materials independently and role play activities as a teacher led activity). I personally think the latter worked best.
     
  4. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I work somewhere between those two examples. A focus session (lesson?) of about 15 - 20 minutes with a group, alternated with a fairly free flow session using continuous provision and TA input related to the theme.
     
  5. skills324

    skills324 New commenter

    But is there any evidence to suggest this kind of practice was more beneficial.

    I like to think that my reception class is a good balance and mixture of both, capturing their interests.
    Some children may not be interested in billy goats gruff and building a bridge for the goats to pass over. But they may wish to build a car or something else tht they are interested in. Both activities would result in the child learning and meeting various scale points i'm sure.
     
  6. I am really glad you have asked this question as I am always wondering what to for the best. I am spending this weekend trying to sort out my timetable so will be interested what everyone has to say! Would love to know how many adult led activities people have.
     
  7. We have just had ofsted and got outstanding for provision, but I know that each team will look for different things but I am happy to share how we do things. This is how I do it and it really works for us. I do a 25 min input in the morning then 2 adults will do guided group work related to the input and one adult will be in the CP either observing children, playing with them or have another activity that they are focusing on. The CP is free flow inside and outside. So for example on Monday morning we do shared writing for 25 minutes as a whole class then between 2 adults we do 6 guided writing groups. Sometimes this will take us outside with clipboards or inside at tables or in different areas of the CP depending on what we are doing. The other adult might have set up a creative activity they are observing or be observing the target children but this varies from week to week. At 11.30 we tidy up and have full class phonics from 11.35-11.55. The afternoon works in the same format but we just have 2 adults. We have another full class input then indoor and outdoor guided activities followed by 20 minutes of maths at the end of each day. The afternoon input normally links to one of the guided activities but this is not always the case.
    We have focused activities in the areas of continuous provision linked to the inputs we have in class but the children are not required to do them if they want to come up with their own ideas.
    Hope this helps and makes sense. It is Friday night after all x
     
  8. Hi Milly, could you put your timetable up in resources as struggling to picture it although it seems very interesting!
     
  9. i'm also interested in seeing your timetable and an eg of your planning for the week if you could post in resources - sounds similar to my classroom setup which is always reassuring
     

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