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What does a 'good' exercise book look like?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by King38, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. Just had an LA review and we were criticised for our inconsistent books within KS1 & KS2. Marking was scant and 'secretarial' in most cases. One teacher was praised but she seems to write pages. Having looked at some other books from different schools, alot of teachers differ in what they mark and write.
    We do have a marking policy and code system but again this varies! Do any of you have fantastic systems that the children can relate to, has meaningful 'next steps' etc but doesn't take an age to mark?
    Thanks
     
  2. Just had an LA review and we were criticised for our inconsistent books within KS1 & KS2. Marking was scant and 'secretarial' in most cases. One teacher was praised but she seems to write pages. Having looked at some other books from different schools, alot of teachers differ in what they mark and write.
    We do have a marking policy and code system but again this varies! Do any of you have fantastic systems that the children can relate to, has meaningful 'next steps' etc but doesn't take an age to mark?
    Thanks
     
  3. We use a star and arrow to denote 'something good' and 'something to aim for next time'. The children understand it well. We have also flirted with a coded system to mark. The children (I felt) were less likely to use this system, and I found the codes didn't always apply to the feedback I wanted to give, so I don't use this now.
    Our book monitoring suggests that in KS2, 'most' books should be marked formatively, which, in practice, means I can get away with 'tick and flick' in about a quarter of my marking of maths and english. Other books are (predictably) not checked, but I try to mark about half of the time in these in a formative way.
    I speed things up by (usually) deciding three different types of feedback and applying these as a 'best fit'. This works well in maths, where I tend to ask a question to check understanding or extend. Writing tends to be a bit more personalised and involved and ALWAYS takes an age no matter what I do - especiallyanything requiring a level.
    I get the children to mark their own/peer mark a lot too.
     
  4. For one reason or another, I had chance to look through a colleague's Maths books. This colleague is graded 'Outstanding' and I don't doubt it. I was pretty surprised, though, to see that ALL of the marking had been done by an LSA (who has very distinctive handwriting)! NO idea how she gets away with that!
     

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