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What do you make of this?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Duke of York, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

  2. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    It shows our rich are worth it for the way they have managed our economy.
     
  3. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    Extraordinary how we managed to acquire the world's best by a long chalk. What do you imagine attracted them to this God-forsaken $hithole?
     
    Ivartheboneless likes this.
  4. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    Are we looking at this from a very short-term perspective? Throughout history there has been The Rich - and jolly rich they were, compared with - The Poor. Only since the end of WW2 did that gap narrow to make previously poor people feel that much richer; and even later did the children of the previously-poor get the opportunities to make them, if not RICH, then certainly richer than their parents might ever have dreamt of.
    Was that not just a blip? Inequality and unfairness are a gigantic part of life - ask most of the world's population. If all the way things are is nudge back to how it's always been, then either you have to do something about it (ideas welcome), or accept that once you've managed to grab a massive pile of cash, you're in a situation that Ms Foodbank is never going to see apart from via envy-making media.
    Personally, I can't believe that I, a person of no particular talent from unwealthy origins, live so comfortably. If I have a billion times less than some, I'll get over it. At least I probably won't die in a helicopter fireball.
     
    george1963, peter12171 and needabreak like this.
  5. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    Although the graph isn't representative of the world, it appears that Britain is the least favourable place to live in terms of inequality and unfairness of the nations listed. It's particularly noticeable how much moreso that became after the Tories returned to power in 2010.
     
  6. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    God. We should be crying into our pillows every night.
    WE HAVE SO MUCH.
    If we haven't got as much as some other people, then maybe the wrath'n'envy problem is with us, not those who either were cleverer/more hardworking or just got lucky.
     
  7. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    You and I can count ourselves lucky that we have pillows to sleep on. Do the growing numbers of homeless in Britain share that luxury?
     
    vinnie24 and monicabilongame like this.
  8. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    What are your thoughts about the data on the UK against say Germany, Italy and France?

    I take it no one is keen enough on South Korea or Japan to make a move, although I do know a couple of people who have, for now anyway.

    Edit - it is interesting how the terminology used to describe issues has moved over the years from economic performance indicators including HDI to wealth and poverty indicators. I think HDI is a somewhat more important indicator of wellbeing than GDP if it is people that we are concerned with.

    http://hdr.undp.org/en/2018-update

    All is not lost and it could be worse.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  9. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    This isn't a comparison of personal circumstances, though, is it
     
    george1963 and needabreak like this.
  10. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    The data speaks for itself. The gap between rich and poor is three times greater than the worst of those. It's obscene.
     
  11. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    how about inviting a homeless person to share the pillows in your house @Duke of York. You seem to talk enough about poverty and homelessness. There are things you can do to help, you know
     
  12. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    They're a tiny minority, DoY, for whom more should indeed be done, but you cannot count The Homeless as if they are a homogenous group of badly-done-tos. I don't know what your take is on addiction to substances, violence etc but actions have consequences,and frank mental illness aside, most of the people who end upon the streets have addiction or criminal problems.
    I used to volunteer. I have pity for individuals but I don't by and large blame Society, man, for their appearance. Maybe it was a local demographic.
     
    needabreak likes this.
  13. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    I don't think that is what your graph is showing, at all, and if you have seen the slums ad shanty towns in Italy, for example, you would know that the situation there is worse than here, in most of the ways you want to measure it.
     
    needabreak likes this.
  14. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    That's true enough, but there's an F-ing sight more that all of us can do, starting with kicking the arrses of those who allow this pitiful state of affairs to continue to grow, out of government forever.
     
  15. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    That might be too personal a suggestion. ;)
     
  16. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Yes and use our democratic system to do so. But again en masse we don't do we because not enough people feel as strongly as you appear to or they consider other factors when they decide which box to tick in the ballot box.
     
  17. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    Dunnocks - I have two spare double bedrooms and a sofa bed downstairs. I would not in a million years invite a homeless person I hadn't known for many years before their present problems into it for the reasons mentioned above. I could not sleep without locking my valuables away and bolting my bedroom door ten times.
    I am on daily chatting terms with two local homeless people but one freely admits he has anger management issues and is not even allowed in the local church or library for "kicking off" (ex-military) and the other is an alcoholic. I am happy to take either for lunch when it's rainy or snowy, and the local restaurateurs will take them at lunchtime but not evening, not because that's when they get more customers but because that's when their behaviour is worse (theories welcome).
    Both are eligible for treatment but neither will abide by the restrictions thereby placed upon them. Choices. Every one, by every person, shaped by experience and contingency. There are some things that not even the bleedingest heart can control.
     
  18. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    there was just as poverty, destitution and homelessness under the last government.
     
    sparklepig2002 likes this.
  19. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    there are many other people you could help

    look at nightstop or "refugees at home"

    The people referred by such charities are not likely to cause you any trouble at all, they have far more to lose than you do. You can host and individual who would otherwise be sleeping on the street. i do it regularly. There is no reason why not to do it, anyone who wants to take action against rough sleeping and has a spare room should definitely look into this.
     
  20. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    I don't disagree that it existed, but not on the scale it now is. I don't know how good your memory is, but I worked in London throughout the 70s and 80s and often spent my evenings there too. I never once saw someone sleeping rough before the Thatcher era.
     

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