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what do you look for in an interview lesson?

Discussion in 'Music' started by Sallym86, May 18, 2011.

  1. I have 2 interviews next week!
    Can I ask anyone who interviews candidates, what are you looking for when you observe a lesson? What are the key things that make you choose that person?

    Thanks


     
  2. I have 2 interviews next week!
    Can I ask anyone who interviews candidates, what are you looking for when you observe a lesson? What are the key things that make you choose that person?

    Thanks


     
  3. I am a PGCE mentor and I always tell my students make sure you have a lesson plan for the interviewer, make sure you always write your lesson and learning objectives up somewhere, always be positive and smile, if you hear a kids name being used by a friend then try and use it later in the obs time. Make sure your lesson is what is being asked for by the school not what is your best show lesson. Be confident when singing. Have some questions to ask the interviewing panel (I have read on the website that the school has an annual exchange with......in Spain for example. Offer your services - schools always struggle to get people to go on school trips!)Engage with the kids sitting in front of you...don't be all about the lesson and how wonderful you are to have planned such an amazing lesson! Include some assessment for learning techniques - making sure that you can check their learning as you are going along (OFSTED box ticked!).
     
  4. Although I agree with the previous poster, expecting paperwork to be decent and in place is a given in my book. I look for someone who has planned an interesting lesson and can adapt their delivery to suit the group they're faced with where necessary. E.g. If you had a singing lesson planned and you were faced with a group who weren't very skilled you would recognise this instantly and minimise the arrangement from 3 part to 2 part. At the other end of the scale if they were better than expected the same piece could offer the extension activities, either by musical detail or further harmonies/counterpoint. I generally look for someone who is obviously well skilled in their specialism, bright, passionate about music and can enthuse the students, good behaviour management and lots of directed q&a keeping them all on their toes.
     

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