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What do you do with your child's outgrown picture books?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by rustybug, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. She is nearly 11, and through 2 major clearouts she still has about 2 entire bookshelves full of the picture books we read to her throughout the years. (eg Giraffes can't dance, The Gruffalo, Sharing a Shell, all that ilk). We did a major prune, only keeping the impossibly special ones that we can both remember poring over for ages, pointing out lovely parts of the story / pictures. That still leaves us with 2 shelves full.
    She's never going to read them again, nor am I. But they played a huge part in our lives, and it seems awful to just get rid of them.
    But its 2 shelves full!
     
  2. She is nearly 11, and through 2 major clearouts she still has about 2 entire bookshelves full of the picture books we read to her throughout the years. (eg Giraffes can't dance, The Gruffalo, Sharing a Shell, all that ilk). We did a major prune, only keeping the impossibly special ones that we can both remember poring over for ages, pointing out lovely parts of the story / pictures. That still leaves us with 2 shelves full.
    She's never going to read them again, nor am I. But they played a huge part in our lives, and it seems awful to just get rid of them.
    But its 2 shelves full!
     
  3. Put them in storage until you can read them with a grandchild?
     
  4. What about donating them to your local childrens hospital or a childrens charity?
     
  5. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    Donate them to your local Children's Centre.
     
  6. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

  7. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    That's what I intend to do - and what my mum did for me. I love reading my children my old books, on so many levels :) (but it's not quite so many as 2 shelves! My books - and those of my children - get fairly heavy wear...!)
     
  8. The thing is, when we were kids, most books were hardback and made with stitching, while all these are the modern sort, big (mostly softback) ones held together with glue. I doubt if they'd last into another generation, and our loft is hideous.
    If I give them away (and I have friends with kids the right age who'd no doubt appreciate them) then we wouldn't have them any more! It's one thing to blithely say "We'll never read them again", another altogether to know that we won't be able to! Ever!![​IMG]
    It's odd, with her being the youngest I chuck out outgrown clothes, equipment, bikes, toys, rollerblades etc with pure joy in my heart. It's only these books I am having trouble with.
    I might just have to find a very stout box in which they could survive our hostile spidery, dusty bird-infested loft, and let the glue take its chances.
     
  9. My mum kept our favourite picture books (and, indeed, older children's books too) and my nephew, who is two, reads them avidly. Yes, some of the paperback ones have started to disintegrate - but for the ones he really likes, my sister bought him new copies for his birthday. Having said that, my parents are now thoroughly sick of some of these books, having read them repeatedly to two generations!
     
  10. nqt04

    nqt04 New commenter

    My nearly-17 year old refuses even a first cull!

    As you say, the memories are so powerful and complex - not just the stories, but when and where they were read, and by whom.

    We not only have the books, but all the cars, trains, Lego ... a shrine to a happy childhood, I like to think.
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I took my children's picture books to school to use in my class and now 10 years later my daughter has started buying her favourites so my advice is hold onto a few special favourites.
     
  12. Chica77

    Chica77 New commenter

    My parents kept the books we had as kids, they were in the loft. My mum got them all out for my son who's 2 now. They're in pretty good condition actually! I think we'll keep all the books we have.
     
  13. My almost 21 year old is currently going through hers as we are moving and we have kept them all. She is keeping the really special ones and lovingly packing the others up to take to a charity shop. 24 year old son is coming home next weekend to go through all his 'special' stuff in the loft. I know that a lot of it will move with me to keep for when they have children of their own, but I hope we can keep it to manageable amounts as I will not have huge amounts of storage space in my new home. I tried to get them to do it when they were younger - oh how I wish I had persevered at the time!
     
  14. If you have the space and can store them, keep them!
    I recently went through boxes of books that my parents kept and have put some aside for my daughter to read. [​IMG]
    For some reason though they sold my Enid Blyton collection at the car boot sale, it broke my heart!
     
  15. lindenlea

    lindenlea Star commenter

    Save them somehow. My grandaughter will be treated to "The Wind Blew" soon. I can still read it without looking at the words.
     
  16. Savw them.
    I remember being relieved when I got rid of my boys books, games lego etc. Having the space was great.
    Now with a two year old grandson I sooooo widh I'd kept them.
    Especially the books and the Lego.
     
  17. Yes, save them.
    I regret having given away my children's picture books (and Lego, Brio train set etc) and am now seeking to replace them from charity shops ready for my grandchildren. (I still haven't managed to find a copy of Dogger yet)
    Talking of charity shops, having worked in one, be aware that your precious, much loved and generously donated treasure may well be unceremoniously dumped in the recycling bin (or worse) unless it's in 'almost new' condition.
     
  18. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    give then to the school or a classroom?
     
  19. Everything they had that could be passed on to friends' children was passed on. But from age 8 or so, all their lovely books, some handmade by me, some pop-ups, some first-edition presents, are in a big box in the attic, awaiting the pleasure of the grandchildren. My Arthur Mee Children's Encyclopedia in ten volumes, which my parents bought for me, is up there with them.
     
  20. vannie

    vannie Star commenter

    I took a lot of my son's books to school but saved the real favourites for him.
    I've always tried to save significant stuff - space permitting. It's a nice reminder for them when they get older I think.
     

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