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What constitutes an 'outstanding' lesson these days?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by DJL, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. DJL

    DJL

    I'm not asking for interview lesson ideas! But have been out of mainstream teaching for a few years (in SEN) and now having to apply for a wider range of posts as we have relocated and there are very few jobs. I feel I still have a lot to offer mainstream schools and that my experience of severe SEN might be very helpful. However, I'm probably very out of touch with what goes on in mainstream at the moment and particularly will be out of touch with current ICT (working at much lower levels in SEN).
    So what is current thinking around good teaching at the moment? I left mainstream around the time of 3 - 5 part lessons. Does EVERYONE use 'WALT' and 'WILF' now, or is that an individual school thing? Is ICT expected to be used to its full capacity in every lesson? If I get as far as interview and have to do a lesson, will it be expected to be way beyond a maths investigation or a story/ drama activity?
    Haven't posted on TES since going on maternity leave about 17 months ago! Nice to be back.
     
  2. DJL

    DJL

    I'm not asking for interview lesson ideas! But have been out of mainstream teaching for a few years (in SEN) and now having to apply for a wider range of posts as we have relocated and there are very few jobs. I feel I still have a lot to offer mainstream schools and that my experience of severe SEN might be very helpful. However, I'm probably very out of touch with what goes on in mainstream at the moment and particularly will be out of touch with current ICT (working at much lower levels in SEN).
    So what is current thinking around good teaching at the moment? I left mainstream around the time of 3 - 5 part lessons. Does EVERYONE use 'WALT' and 'WILF' now, or is that an individual school thing? Is ICT expected to be used to its full capacity in every lesson? If I get as far as interview and have to do a lesson, will it be expected to be way beyond a maths investigation or a story/ drama activity?
    Haven't posted on TES since going on maternity leave about 17 months ago! Nice to be back.
     
  3. clawthorpegirl

    clawthorpegirl New commenter

    Am no expert as have been at same school since qualifying, however ...
    we (and many other schools ) have moved away from WALT & WILF onto learning challenges in form of a question, share these with children before, during and at end of lesson and try to ensure children have met the challenge (keep them small and simple), therefore demonstrating what learning has taken place.
    Regarding structure of lesson this is probably very different depending on the school, I still have a clear oral / mental starter in maths, main input, group activities and plenary. English less structured, word level work mainly taught in seperate phonics / support for spelling, so might spend entire lesson unpicking a piece of text, engaged in talk for writing / role play / drama, in in an extended piece of writing - it really varies but I try to have a balance over 2 /3 week period.
    ICT would ideally be used in every lesson where it could enhance learning.
    For an interview lesson I would imagine that your manner with and ability to enthuse the children, while ensuring they learn something (whatever that may be) would be the key factor.
    Good Luck
     
  4. DJL

    DJL

    Thanks for that. I was hoping WALT and WILF had gone out the window now! I agree with the concept, but did hate that formulaic way of doing it and seeing it written on every classroom board you ever went in. Can you, or anyone else, give a few examples of how you're using ICT at the moment? Maybe I should start a new thread for that. Thanks again.
     
  5. That would depend entirely on the school.Our SLT suddenly have a renewed love for it so we have to print Walts and wilfs every day to be plastered over the walls.
     
  6. being less than 30 is normally the main criteria these days.
    if you are post threshold , a career teacher ( not SLT) and over 40 - then you are normall considered to be less than satisfactory.
    and if you dont believe me - ask your union which teachers are most on capapbilities.
     
  7. normally
     
  8. being outstanding is a poisoned chalice
    i was graded outstanding by HMI when the rest of the school was in special measures. It led to being bullied by the head and deputy and extra criticism. i put it doen to professional jealousy and left as quickly as i could.

     
  9. paulie86

    paulie86 New commenter

    If you actually teach in a lesson, this is frowned upon! Its all about the children working independently on the tasks to find the answer. We are still expected to have a LO, but this must be based on the learning not the task. (What ever this means) I have found I had a bout of satisfactory lessons for lesson i felt were better. Doing minimal teaching at the front and having the children working in groups or independently has gained me goods. It seems bizare that doing less teaching and class work togther is what they want to see, but it seems it is these days.
     
  10. paulie86

    paulie86 New commenter

    ICT I use:
    I always display my L.O and SC on the interactive board at the start of the lesson (with the attainment focus and level(s) if its Maths, Eng or Sci)
    I use boardworks for plenerys, (mainly if its stuff the kids can get up and do)
    Other programs such as My Maths, Abacus etc,
    Have key words and definitions to match up onn the interacive board,
    Laptops used as an extension task, (pick a game or questions etc onmy maths, children move on when ready)
    I let them use didital cameras to record observations in science,
    Digiblue microscope in science and I have also used this to display hardcopies of things on the board,
    Data loggers in science.
     
  11. We don't have WALT and WILF but we have to display and share our LO and SC.
    As for ICT, I use the IWB and down load clips from the net to use in lessons in all kinds of ways. I also use it for photos that I have taken to support geography etc. We have just got some little devices - can't remember what they are called but they work like millionaire where everyone can vote - but they do loads more stuff.
     
  12. Hi Clawthorpes girl. Could you give us some examples of your questions. I think this is what i do but just wanted to check!
    Thanks

    andyknox1@hotmail.com
     
  13. I think that the less children have to listen to someone talking, and the more they have to use skills to find answers for themselves, the better they will retain the knowledge.
    Yes, teacher give the children some input first, but then direct them in their independent work. It's about learning!
    I don't think it's bizarre at all - there's no point in creating a group of children who want to be spoonfed everything.

     
  14. paulie86

    paulie86 New commenter

    I think if you are good in your questioning of the children and it is a 2 way discusuion the children can learn a hell of a lot from the teacher and each other.
     
  15. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    Who cares? The money's the same at the end of the month.
     
  16. ShadowMan

    ShadowMan New commenter

    It's easy to be outstanding. You just have to find out what's on the tick sheet of the person observing you.
    Simples.
     
  17. clawthorpegirl

    clawthorpegirl New commenter

    Just turn LO into a question instead i.e. Can you use the greater than and less than signs in these number sentences? Can you use two adjectives in the first sentence of your story? Can you make a bulb light? - sorry, these sound very dull but gives you general idea.
     
  18. CB123

    CB123 New commenter

    I recently went on the outstanding teacher programme and to be honest what they was saying outstanding fustrated me. In every session they talked about the starter the teacher talk, independent work, the plenary. I may be wrong but personally I don't think following that rule always make an outstanding lesson. I often find my class ( possibly because they have a low attention span) work better from a short teacher input, independent work , bit more teacher input, independent work etc. Also , as I think was mentioned earlier, sometimes very little input is given, instead some well thought out questions are given and the children investigate the questions themselves to find the answers - the children feel like they have taught themselves. Surely an outstanding teacher should be someone who adapts their teaching to help the children learn and reach their potential.

    As a few people have said my school also uses learning challenge questions. When possible I try not to use can I ....? As the children can just answer yes or no. Instead we try to use questions which involve the childrne having to explain what they are doing. eg How can you make a bulb light up? What method helps you add 9 to a number? etc
     
  19. We have just had OFSTED and I was observed 3 times! Each one was a good thankfully but one of the comments was about too much input. They are definitely looking at shorter teacher inputs, relevant and suitable differentiation, lots of open ended questioning, all of the children engaged and challenged plus positive feedback in books alongside next step comments.
    Hope this helps.
     
  20. I just uploaded a free presentation which I used last week on "how to teach an outstanding lesson." It gives you all the key questions you should ask yourself about a lesson plan to make sure the lesson is Outstanding. www.lkmconsulting.co.uk/library

    The key theme is progress. How much progress has been made by how many pupils? You need to know where they are all starting from and where they are by the end of the lesson. Make this explicit through a clear starter that shows where they're at, mini-plenaries which show that milestones have been reached/what will come next and a final plenary that shows they can do something which they couldn't do at the start. So long as all of them have moved a significant way forward and that that is as a result of your teaching then you'll be outstanding. Doing that will require effective and varied assessment throughout and personalisation - 2 other key aspects of an Outstanding lesson. Then, for what I call the Champagne make sure you've included interaction and independent learning. All of this needs to be built on the foundation of good relationships and raport.

    Loic Menzies, Twitter: @LKMco
     

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