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What can I do instead of teaching?

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by excitableashell, Jan 1, 2007.

  1. I hope there is someone out there who can help me with my career plight!
    I have been teaching now for 7 years in primary schools. 4 years ago I was experiencing horrible conditions with my health which included constant nausea which my Dr was trying to solve for me through a range of medication. I eventually moved school and it seems my stomach complaints went with the move, not something I realised at the time!
    Over the past year my symptoms appear to of returned with avengence (due to my job)! I have been treated for depression (something my Head had no understanding of & made my life hell when I was absent for this!) & have recently been told that my symptoms are caused by anxiety. Basically I am not happy teaching anymore and dread the fact that I have to do so, hence it now badly affecting my health. My partner has been very understanding and wants to support me through this time and a much needed career change. My problem is I don't know where to start looking?! Obviously I would like a reasonable wage (although am prepared to be dropping a little from what I am currently on) but what can I do?? I feel there is no life during teaching and no life after teaching! Has anyone out there any suggestions of where I can get guidance or indeed what can I do? Has anyone been in a similar position and if so what are you doing now? I am at my witts end but I know I have to leave for my health, any ideas please?!
     
  2. I hope there is someone out there who can help me with my career plight!
    I have been teaching now for 7 years in primary schools. 4 years ago I was experiencing horrible conditions with my health which included constant nausea which my Dr was trying to solve for me through a range of medication. I eventually moved school and it seems my stomach complaints went with the move, not something I realised at the time!
    Over the past year my symptoms appear to of returned with avengence (due to my job)! I have been treated for depression (something my Head had no understanding of & made my life hell when I was absent for this!) & have recently been told that my symptoms are caused by anxiety. Basically I am not happy teaching anymore and dread the fact that I have to do so, hence it now badly affecting my health. My partner has been very understanding and wants to support me through this time and a much needed career change. My problem is I don't know where to start looking?! Obviously I would like a reasonable wage (although am prepared to be dropping a little from what I am currently on) but what can I do?? I feel there is no life during teaching and no life after teaching! Has anyone out there any suggestions of where I can get guidance or indeed what can I do? Has anyone been in a similar position and if so what are you doing now? I am at my witts end but I know I have to leave for my health, any ideas please?!
     
  3. what about the non-teaching jobs advertised in TES, you know, working for the LEA. I'm applying for one at the moment that is going around certain schools making sure they have the necessary bumph to deliver healthy living in PSHE...just an example.

    orrrr..you could work for social services, obviously not as a social worker, but you could be a support worker, salary is only 15/16k though so would be quite a drop.

    what about going to teach in a special school - totally different setup to mainstream by all accounts.

    do you have any retail experience? you could go into retail management.

    a good sidestep would be into the prison service, wtih your experience you could go on their graduate programme and miss out being a prison officer and go straight onto wing governor.

    orr you could work for the probation service in various capacities.

    lol can you tell i have been researching this for myself?!

    have a browse on fish4jobs see what takes your eye
     
  4. Before doing my PGCE for secondary Science I had worked in what teachers call 'industry'; I call it ICI,the Scottish courts, Air Traffic Control, Instrument maintenance, Biological research. Yet it only took few years of teaching to obliterate my confidence in being able to do anything else. I have come out of it, by re-training and am steadily building up a viable practice in clinical hypnotherapy.

    There is a lot to be gained from teaching, I met some wonderful pupils and it totally re-configured my impression of today's youth for the better. However, I know that I am better out than in, I still do a little supply but it is a cash boost rather than a career.

    Why not get some independent career advice, go to the library and look at career guides, don't be afraid to get out of school, there are thousands of successful and happy ex-teachers out here doing real jobs. So don't get morose, don't get disheartened, don't get depressed; use your energy in a positive sense bearing in mind the restrictions of the Burgundy book that is designed to lock you into teaching; so get active soon.

     
  5. Thanks, it has given me a little food for thought. I was wondering though how I go about setting up my CV for new employers to want me.
    Whilst I was at college training to be a teacher i did a part-time customer service role which I enjoyed. My main fear of looking for something like this again is that I will go right to the bottom of the ladder, not really a financially viable option, so how do I go about getting those slightly better jobs? Is it possible to jump in a little higher up? How do I get employers to want me instead of those people with experience in that specific industry? Sorry for all the questions, but you are right I must bite the bullet soon for my own sanity, I just want to do it properly and not jump into the wrong job again or too low down for my skills.
     
  6. I am so with you! I do LOVE what teaching should be about but I am finding it difficult to get enthused about it any more. To be honest...I am bored!!! It just doesn't feel like a vital, creative position any more. It feels like a long hard slog up a ravine whilst dodging rocks!

    I have had half an eye on alternatives for a few years BUT the problem is pay. I cannot afford to take a 50% pay cut to do something else or start at the bottom of somewhere. Perhaps if I left London...? Where can we go for career advice? Most people seem to turn to other public services first but, to be honest, I'm sure that what is frustrating in teaching is frustrating in other areas. I have worked as a Learning Mentor (I loved that but there was no full-time permanent position available once my contract came to an end AND in most parts of London it's very poorly paid) and had contact with other agencies and think social work would drive me to drink in a second!!!

    I would love to hear success stories. I would love to be inspired by those of you who have used their skills to find alternatives to teaching...thank you.
     
  7. HSL

    HSL

    I'm still in teaching, but on my own terms. I'm a self-employed, peripatetic languages teacher. I cover PPA time in Primary Schools, do private tuition and run my own evening classes and GCSE crammer courses.
    After 5 years teaching in secondary schools, I was completely disillusioned, and it was affecting my health (especially after having been harrassed at home be students). I took the plunge and went it alone. I have been doing this since August 2005, and am now fully booked.
    It is possible to still teach, get the best bits of teaching and have a decent income. It's not easy, especially the admin/ marketing side, but it is worth it.
     
  8. eddiev

    eddiev New commenter

    I too am working towards leaving teaching in July. I went on the Learn Direct website, and they have a Skills Test you can complete online, which brings up lots of helpful career suggestions. It's
    www.learndirect-advice.co.uk
    then you go to the 'match your skills and interests' bit.
    Also, for your CV, do you have any friends in management positions anywhere outside teaching? My friend's boyfriend is a pensions manager, and interviews lots of people. He has kindly offered to help me with my CV- just one conversation with him helped me to realise I've got lots of skills (multi-tasking, people skills, prioritising workloads)that employers want.
    Hope that helps, xx
     
  9. janemk

    janemk New commenter

    Like HSL, am a languages teacher and am currently setting up on my own as a freelancer. My longer term goal however, is counselling, and am retraining one evening a week to qualify to do this. Once qualified the salaries advertised (or even freelance) are equal to a few years up the teaching ladder and whilst they won't climb, you do have the possibility of managing your own time and work, and living a relatively (compared to school teaching!) stress-free life.

    I don't know what your interests are but maybe you could think about qualifying as something else in the evenings and then you could go straight into it when you finish teaching without too much of a drop in salary?
     
  10. Hi, Sorry to hear you are having a rough time of it but there are a few viable alternatives. I taught for 3 years and jacked it in after feeling like death warmed up most of the time. I initially took a big drop in pay and began working as a Liaison Officer at a local FE college (i was a primary teacher). From this i went on to work in another college doing PR and Marketing - i was fortunate enough to have their financial support in studying for my CIM qualifications. After 4 years of this i decided i wanted to work more closely with young people so got a job with Connexions and am now a fully qualified careers adviser with them, earning as much as if i was still in teaching. My advice to you would be to contact your local Next Step - they offer adult careers guidance and will help you consider your options and work out where your skills are, you should be able to find their details on the net. Good luck!
     
  11. Thanks for all the advice, it has been a great help. I will definitely be checking out the 'Next Step' option, see if they can shed some light on my future options!

    I was wondering if there were any other teachers or non-teachers out there who have success stories or any other suggestions I could follow. Any and all advice very helpful!
    It has been good to hear that I am not the only one going through or who has been through this.
     
  12. As ever, the message board brings light to dark days! I too am trying to find my way out of teaching, I've been off work now with stress since September and feel like I'll never find any job I can enjoy. This thread had been really useful, I've already emailed Learn Direct AND I feel some hope. So thanks everyone x
     
  13. chimp28 - please could you get in touch with me about working for Connexions as I really want to go into that but am struggling to get any first-hand experience of it, and how easy it is to find a job etc. My email is jzebedee@hotmail.com .

    Exciteableashell - you are most certainly not alone! I am currently TTC and do not intend to return to teaching, but if that hasn't worked out by around Easter I think I will hand in my resignation anyway, scary thought but will be better for me in the long run. The Prospects website (possibly same as Learn Direct?) is a good one, I rang Learn Direct on their freephone number and they asked me some questions and gave me job descriptions etc. Also there is a publication called Beyond the Classroom http://www.mmu.ac.uk/careers/online_guides/Beyond%20the%20Classroom. There is loads of help out there for you, and the ones mentioned are all excellent.

    I will let you know if I find anything!
     
  14. snowboarder

    snowboarder New commenter

    chimp28 - could you also e-mail me about connexions I have been on their website to try to find some info but keep going round in circles...lol

    missdizzyblonde@fsmail.net
     
  15. Hi snowboarder, it's really frustrating isn't it?! There don't seem to be many jobs which is what worries me, and I know Connexions is run by different companies around the country, and some take you on from scratch and train you up, whereas others seem to need an NVQ. Let me know if you get any joy! ;)
     
  16. I left class room teaching many years back, having taught secondary English, then went into further ed, then into primary, then retrained as a Coach. (similar to counselling but more focused on action and results.) I have helped many teachers with career choices since. If you would like a free initial chat, or a free monthly email newsletter, please get in touch: contact@aspire-coaching.co.uk
     
  17. I myself have recently visited a careers 'coach' advisor who could help with my career choice. We had a brilliant first meeting where it was outlined what could be achieved etc. All this was very postitive for me and atlast there seemed to a very bright light at the end of the tunnel.
    I then find out there is a catch...all £795+vat worth of catch!
    Now I am sure for some people this amount of money may not be a problem to locate, I however couldn't afford this despite how desperate I have become with my health and the need for a career change. (I know some people may think its money well spent, but my next challenge would of been getting out of debt, a step I wasn't willing to add to my depression & anxieties!)
    And that is why I posted my initial thread on here. I wanted to hear about real people and how they have coped and where they have sought help.
    No offence to the service you are offering but unfortunately I am now very wary about independent careers advisors and I feel other people should be too.
     
  18. janemk

    janemk New commenter

    As your doctor knows about your stress/anxiety related physical symptoms I'm sure he/she would put you down for actual counselling if you wanted it. This will not only help with the issues causing your physical symptoms but will also give you the opportunity to work out your future plans. And it's free on the NHS!
     
  19. Hi Janemk, I have been down this road with my Dr. She has suggested some counselling but unfortunately it is not free on the NHS, only severe mental health problems are when you have been assessed.
    In the mean time I am using self-help books on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy as suggested by my Dr. to try and understand what causes my anxieties. She is the first person to say I need out of teaching, easier said then done unfortunately.
     
  20. Exciteable - I'm surprised to hear you say that counselling isn't free on the NHS. I've just completed a course of counselling through my GP which was entirely free. I also had counselling, free, through my previous doctor in a different area.

    Good luck anyway!
     

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