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What are your experiences of teaching Shakespeare?

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by fluidmotiontheatre, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. I am currently a cover supervisor at a Secondary School in Hampshire but also the Artistic Director of Fluid Motion Theatre Company, based in Hampshire. We provide a number of different educational workshops and projects for schools and colleges and are currently working on our Streetspeare Schools Project which runs alongside our main tour Streetspeare, the aim of which is to encourage the general public to embrace the spirit of Shakespeare by having a go themselves.
    We have a number of schools signed up to the project which looks at alternative ways in which young people can interact with Shakespeare, through street performance workshops that lead to a performance in the streets of thier local towns or cities.
    I am just wondering about any positive experiences you may have had in teaching Shakespeare in schools at both Key Stage 3 and 4, maybe working alongside a theatre company or using drama in your own teaching. I am also interested in any negative experiences you have had, what made them so and what would have worked better.
    Regards
    Leigh Johnstone
    www.fluidmotiontheatre.co.uk
     
  2. I am currently a cover supervisor at a Secondary School in Hampshire but also the Artistic Director of Fluid Motion Theatre Company, based in Hampshire. We provide a number of different educational workshops and projects for schools and colleges and are currently working on our Streetspeare Schools Project which runs alongside our main tour Streetspeare, the aim of which is to encourage the general public to embrace the spirit of Shakespeare by having a go themselves.
    We have a number of schools signed up to the project which looks at alternative ways in which young people can interact with Shakespeare, through street performance workshops that lead to a performance in the streets of thier local towns or cities.
    I am just wondering about any positive experiences you may have had in teaching Shakespeare in schools at both Key Stage 3 and 4, maybe working alongside a theatre company or using drama in your own teaching. I am also interested in any negative experiences you have had, what made them so and what would have worked better.
    Regards
    Leigh Johnstone
    www.fluidmotiontheatre.co.uk
     
  3. Teaching Shakespeare to ESL students led me to create a modern English version of Twelfth Night which I produced very successfully with 11 - 13 year olds. We have now written a series of modern English versions of Shakespeare that have been produced in schools around this country and overseas.
    Our aim is bring more people into Shakespeare, to provide a way in via our versions - this works for adults too! You can find out what 7 - 14 year olds who acted in our A Midsummer Night's Dream said about the experience at www.startingshakespeare.co.uk The great thing is that young people can perform these plays when there's no way they could manage the originals. And they get the whole play rather than selected scenes.
     
  4. Many thanks for this. I find it fasinating how people create new versions and new ideas around Shakespeare's plays, it is a very welocming sight that people are still encouraged to make Shakespeare accessible for young people. That is our aim too and like you my company tries to provide young people with ways in which they can enhance thier own understanding of Shakespeare in a creative way.
     
  5. You have PM, Nhojtroh
     

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