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What are the average teaching numbers for a teacher and a HoD?

Discussion in 'Heads of department' started by dianehistory, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. dianehistory

    dianehistory New commenter

    My school is looking to increase the contact lessons next year. At the moment, they are 40 minute lessons, and on average, teachers do around 18. Is that an average number? Is there a big difference between HOD and teachers?
     
  2. dianehistory

    dianehistory New commenter

    My school is looking to increase the contact lessons next year. At the moment, they are 40 minute lessons, and on average, teachers do around 18. Is that an average number? Is there a big difference between HOD and teachers?
     
  3. I'm HOD and teach 19 hours out of 25 a week.
     
  4. I am HOD and I teach 20 out of 25. This is the most I have ever had as HOD. I think it depends on subject sometimes though, Maths and English seem to get more.
     
  5. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    I'm a HOD and this year I teach 36 * 40 minutes lessons. Normally a HOD is more around 30 lessons a week but we had staffing issues.
    18 lessons, wow! [​IMG]
     
  6. I work 4 days each week & over a 2 week timetable teach 32 (out of 40) x 1 hour lessons
     
  7. dianehistory

    dianehistory New commenter

    Oh wow, here was I moaning because other teachers work 16 hours! We are so overstaffed, it feels like theres more teachers than kids sometimes
     
  8. 16 hours? Thats mental. I am HOD and teach 20 out of 25 hours a week. Wish it was 16 though!!!
     
  9. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    we have 50 1hr lessons a fortnight
    Teachers teach 45
    HoDs teach 39
    HoYs teach 36 I think
     
  10. At my school it's 30 periods out of a 40 period week which means that essentially there is not enough time to manage the department, fill in the copious paperwork and do all my own teaching and preparation...hence, I work most evenings and every weekend.
     
  11. I am at a middle school which runs 25 x 1hr long lessons. Most teachers teach 23 or these and are expected to use 30mins of non contact for mentoring pupils in their class. HoD teach less but it varies from dept to dept.
     
  12. staff with no extra responsibilities - 42 out of 50 per fortnight
    me as Head of English - 40, recently lowered to 39 but of my frees four are directed as specific meetings, leaving me just 7 frees for departmental stuff - when I am not taken for cover, as we are now again in our school
    oh, and we are all form tutors as well - great!
     
  13. In my school,no additional responsibilities means 44 out of 50 which I think is far too much - and you might end up with 2 frees one week and 4 the next!
    Key stage coordinators are on 42. The majority of HOD on 40 (Eng, Math Science 39). As pointed out in an earlier post, they give HODs extra non-contact time then immediately take it away by forcing us to do support cover and line management meetings. I am prepared to work all the hours available after school and at home but some things (such as learning walks, student interviews and the like) have to take place during the school day and we need the time to do it. Nothing I do in my non-contact time ever has anything to do with my own classes or preparation, by the way, as it is always about sorting out stuff and problems for other people. Giving me a bit more time as HOD is the single thing that would make my job easier, but since it is ultimately about saving money and not people it will not happen.

     
  14. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    hear hear!
     
  15. If the average teacher or TLR holder at your school is on 12 hours or anything close per week at the moment, there is some serious mismanagement going on or you're at an unbelievably well-off sponsored academy or private school. Don't get me wrong, teachers should have far more non-contact time than they currently have. 22 hours a week for teachers without responsibility, 18-20 for those with TLRs seems to be the 'industry standard' and it should be a considerably less to consistently deliver the quality demanded of us. However, the sad reality is that school budgets cannot support any more non-contact time than this. I would be amazed if your current load, or anything even close to it, was sustainable. That said, enjoy it - you're in a very fortunate position at the moment. I'm a Deputy Head on virtually the same hours so I for one am very envious!
     

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