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What are the advantages/disadvantages of teaching students at your own place?

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by geek84, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. geek84

    geek84 New commenter

    <font size="2">Hi Folks</font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font><font size="2">I am thinking of teaching students in my own property. Apart from
    that saving myself some travelling time and petrol expenses are there other advantages of teaching
    students at your own home? </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font><font size="2">After all, you would be using your own gas/electricity during that
    time, and even having to make a cup of tea/coffee for the students(s). Is it
    advisable for taking out some special type of insurance for having students in
    your home? For example, a student may claim to have fallen down the stairs at
    your home and try & claim compensation etc? </font>


    Thanks in advance for your response.
     
  2. geek84

    geek84 New commenter

    <font size="2">Hi Folks</font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font><font size="2">I am thinking of teaching students in my own property. Apart from
    that saving myself some travelling time and petrol expenses are there other advantages of teaching
    students at your own home? </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font><font size="2">After all, you would be using your own gas/electricity during that
    time, and even having to make a cup of tea/coffee for the students(s). Is it
    advisable for taking out some special type of insurance for having students in
    your home? For example, a student may claim to have fallen down the stairs at
    your home and try & claim compensation etc? </font>


    Thanks in advance for your response.
     
  3. I don't teach at home partly for those very reasons, and also to try to avoid the middle-aged man alone in the house with an 18 year old girl scenario.


    I would definitely take out insurance if you are teaching students at home.
     
  4. Georginalouise

    Georginalouise New commenter

    I do teach at home and try not to teach out. The advantages are no driving thus no petrol, if we change our mind part way through a session we have all my resources to hand, we have internet access if we want to use it, and I can teach more students in the same time period. It's an advantage that I am female, I ask the parents if they want to stay but they rarely do. I don't give them drinks, except water or squash and they go nowhere else in the house except my kitchen diner and the downstairs loo. I offset a proportion of my gas, electric and phone as a business expense. I have public liability insurance at about £200 a year. My own kids are in the house and while they are usually quiet and well behaved, I have had to apologise for the noise and break up the odd fight, and there was one dreadful evening when the two year old (I had already put her to bed) walked in stark naked and weed on the floor - the 17-year-old boy in the hot seat didn't know what to do with himself. He did come back the following week though. My differential for teaching 'in' and 'out' is £10. Sorry to be sexist though, but when my own A Level student daughter had tutors for maths and physics I deliberately looked for women.
     
  5. geek84

    geek84 New commenter

    <font size="2">Hi Folks</font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font><font size="2">Many thanks
    indeed for your helpful replies. I think I would face the problem of the middle-aged man alone in the house with
    an 18 year old girl scenario.
    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Georginalouise &ndash; If
    I did decide to teach from home, what would you do in a situation if a
    student claims to have fallen down somewhere
    in your property, and tries to claim
    compensation etc?
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
     
  6. Georginalouise

    Georginalouise New commenter

    I have public liability and professional indemnity insurance for £100,000 which costs about £200 per year. I do point out on day one (with a parent there) that we are in my kitchen, it is not a classroom. With the kids that I tutor, I think that they quickly realise that they need me more than I need them and I've never dealt with a family that I have ever felt would sue. There is no need for them to go upstairs and my biggest fear has always been a chair collapsing in the early days when my dining furniture was somewhat old and rickety - since replaced. I did have one family visit where the mother was insistent that the child WOULD get an A in her A level and my job was to ensure that she did. I felt that I was being cornered to agree the child would get an A, and the mother would hold me to that as contractual and would sue if the child didn't. I didn't take the girl on, and muttered something along the lines that I felt they would find a better tutor than me if they kept looking. That was the point at which I took out insurance!
     
  7. langteacher

    langteacher Occasional commenter

    If mum was so certain she would get an A then there would be no need for a tutor!

    No way would I take on a student in those circumstances either!!
     
  8. janlomas

    janlomas New commenter

    Where do you go for your insurance?
     
  9. I got my insurance through my union, ATL. I think the broker is based in Norwich if I remember correctly though I can't remember the name. ATL had arranged a discounted rate for teachers.
     

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