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what am I doing wrong?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by davi_theuk, Sep 27, 2015.

  1. digoryvenn

    digoryvenn Lead commenter

    Hang on a minute OP, you can't attack people for trying to help you and give you advice. Theo is most certainly not racist!
    How unjustified!
     
  2. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    Racist? Don't be ridiculous. Where on earth did you get that impression? Oh, perhaps it was because someone commented on your written English? How silly to take that attitude!
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    OK, to sum up for @davi_theuk :

    1) Your experience and skills as set out in your applications, and the quality of those applications (including level of written English) are such as to obtain interviews. There is therefore no great need to improve the applications

    2) However, your interviews do not get you job offers

    3) There is therefore a need to improve your interviews.

    From the comments above, including mine, there would seem to be three possible areas where you may need to improve:

    1) Possible level of spoken English

    2) Possible reactions or manner in interviews

    3) Possible overall interview skills.

    As I suggested above, do try doing at least one mock interview with a colleague. Best if, having had the feedback from the first one, you then do a second one, putting into effect the suggestions that came out after the initial trial.

    Good luck!


    .
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  4. stmha

    stmha Established commenter

    Dear Davi

    The trouble with people who make thinly veiled rascist comments are they dont actually believe they are rascist. My only relief is that no-one has yet stated "but all my best friends are...."

    Unfortunately there are some heads who will look at your name and decide instantly not to employ you. You may get an interview just to show they allow enthnic minorities in their school...but not for long.

    Your posting here wasnt an application form and probably written on your phone and so of course mistakes will be made. If your name was joe jones I wonder if they those long term posters would have pulled you up. Well it doesnt matter as you apologised for your shocking misjudgement of making a mistake with your posting...please dont repeat the mistake.

    I heard on radio a bbc report about supply companies being instructed by scools (just a joke) that they only wanted teachers with an english accent. Unless we confront the problem it continues.

    The apologists and the denialists will always jump on you for using the R word but dont let them 'hound' you.

    As for jobs..i am glad you are not working in those schools you would not have been happy. Its a simple rule. If you get an interview this confirms your letter of application and refrences are good. If you dont either your letter is poor or your references are poor. If you fail at the interview stage then think back how to improve. Be creative and sell yourself. Look at a schools Ofsted report and apply their weaknesses to your skill set.

    Any more advice let me know.
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    *sigh*

    .
     
  6. lizziescat

    lizziescat Star commenter

    Not all schools get references before inviting for interview.
     
  7. stmha

    stmha Established commenter

    That is true but it will mean your letter is sound. I think most schools will call for references if the field is big enough but not if the applicants are few.
     
  8. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    Yes indeed, @lizziescat. Only a few schools request references before shortlisting, most sending out the invitation to interview at the same time as the reference request.

    However, as many posters know, my grandchildren are. ..


    How can that be? Surely nowadays the vast majority of chools use appointment best practice whereby candidates are allocated a number on receipt of application and the front page with personal information is removed and kept locked up so not seen by the head or anyone else involved in selection. Doesn't your school do that, @stmha?

    Yes, typos and autocorrect on the phone are the bane of my life!

    But my phone doesn't correct grammar, syntax, lexicon.


    Oh yes! On a professional advice forum where we are aiming to support teachers applying for posts in schools, we certainly do advise posters to take care.

    Especially with those common errors such as the homonyms, or misuse of apostrophes.

    A high level of written and spoken English is essential for effective communication with pupils, colleagues and parents.

    And to avoid embarrassing errors in reports!

    .
     
  9. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter


    High confidence. Partner schools are practically pouncing on PGCE diagnostic placement students these days.
     
    Scintillant likes this.
  10. stmha

    stmha Established commenter

    Oh dear think I may have tweaked a nerve.
     
  11. stmha

    stmha Established commenter

    That is such a relief. No racism in our schools. You heard it here first folks. Theo you remind me of one of the characters in Enid Blyton's famous five series...still you have certainly put me and davi in our place.

    All meant with an undercurrent of good british humor, multi- faith humor of course
     
  12. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Talk about shooting the messenger - Theo was asked the question "What am I doing wrong?" and offered some possibles.

    The "too expensive" issue no longer applies, since schools can offer whatever pay they like (i.e. there is no 'this person must be paid x amount' any more).
     
  13. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter


    See point 5.
     
  14. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    What point five do you mean, Vince? Do you mean post number 5?
     
  15. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Oh gotcha! Didn't see it was a link.

    Still don't see its relevance if they didn't call the OP in to discuss the salary in order to find he wanted more than they were willing to pay.
     
  16. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter


    Point 5 of the linked post.
     
  17. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Yes, I got it in the interim! I don't see blue easily on this screen.
     
  18. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter


    I infer, fairly, the prior question of current or most recent salary. Even if the OP did not make an aspirational calculation in response, it's possible that their figure was higher than the interviewer's predetermined budget for the qualities exhibited during interview.

    Yes, pay scales are dead, twitching but dead. So, as in many professions, we ask people to name their price.
     
  19. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    They'd have known that from his application, presumably? So wouldn't have interviewed in the first place if they'd felt he'd want more than they were willing to pay.

    He says they contacted him after the interview and said they'd get him in to discuss salary - and then didn't. That bit doesn't add up at all.
     
  20. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter


    If the figure the OP gave was large but still the right side of breath-taking then it's likely that the OP would still be invited to interview if everything else looked good. Applications just get people onto the interview list. Interviews are where the decisions are made.



    The OP does not say that she was contacted after the interview in this case but was told that she would be contacted. Even if a negative decision had been made then this is a reasonable thing to say and subject to subsequent interviews with other applicants may have been a genuine intention. Quite high on the list of things not to say to an applicant in any interview is 'you're not worth it'.
     

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