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Water Play

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by mehmetdan, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. mehmetdan

    mehmetdan New commenter

    You can only get ill from germs not the cold. If you put hot water in the tray before the children arrive it usually stays warm for an hour or so outside (depending on how cold it is though). The children love to see the steam rising from the tray, an opportunity to see water evaporation they would miss if you didn't. It's difficult sometimes for others to change the way they work especially if they think they are doing their best for the children. You may have to get them on board first before making changes.
     
  2. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I can't post!
     
  3. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I like to put shallow water outside the night before when it's frosty. The children love the ice in the morning. I think outdoor water can be a problem when they're wearing coats and get the sleeves wet although I don't think it would actually make them ill. Could the water be indoors when it's very cold, maybe a smaller tray?
     
  4. Josie Jo

    Josie Jo New commenter

    I find that the main problem with having water outside in the winter in our Nursery is that children have winter coats and gloves on. They cannot put a protective water apron over the top of a bulky coat and they certainly can't roll up their sleeves. They also often can't manage their gloves independently. Coats and sleeves inevitably get wet and then the children get very cold and often have to go home with wet coats - which isn't good in cold weather.
    We always have access to water indoors during the winter, and move it outdoors once the weather is warm enough to go out without a coat.
     

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