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Visual Discrimination - Odd One Out

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by ArtistS4, Apr 22, 2012.

  1. ArtistS4

    ArtistS4 New commenter

    I am doing a lesson on Odd One Out. I was thinking about having laminated sheets of images for the children to look at and decide which is the odd one out. I am stuck how to make this into a 30 minute lesson! The children are only 3 and a half and I don't want them to get bored! Thank you.
     
  2. ArtistS4

    ArtistS4 New commenter

    I am doing a lesson on Odd One Out. I was thinking about having laminated sheets of images for the children to look at and decide which is the odd one out. I am stuck how to make this into a 30 minute lesson! The children are only 3 and a half and I don't want them to get bored! Thank you.
     
  3. Does it have to be for 30 minutes? This seems rather long for such young children, wouldn't something more like 15 mins be more appropriate? I would try to make it into some sort of game, for example children in a circle around various objects. You could have a small number of objects and give children number fans (or whiteboard and pens) to write down the number of the odd one out to aid in assessment. You could perhaps get them to set one up for you too so that they can demonstrate their knowledge while trying to trick the teacher!
     
  4. May2

    May2 Occasional commenter

    Hang on here the OP said they were 3 1/2 year olds, I am not sure they would be up to using number fans and writing numbers on white boards. I would say 15 minutes and do simple visual things . I am not sure if this is whole class or a small group. I would start by choosing some children say 3 girls and one boy to stand at the front and see if they can think why the boy is odd one out, and repeat a couple of times with different combinations of children. Then use objects such as their snack fruit 3 apples one banana etc putting them in different orders so odd one is not always in the same position, Then may be use some toys, cars and a bus or 4 red bricks one green, that sort of thing. It is good opportunity to encourage language by describing why they are different especially if some objects are nearly the same and they need to look really closely. If you have an IWB or even just computers you could show them some odd one out programmes (or make your own powerpoint) www.digitalbutterflies.co.uk has some simple interactive odd one out games that they could then play on after the input.
     
  5. ArtistS4

    ArtistS4 New commenter

    Fantastic - thank you for your help!
     

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