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Visual Behaviour Resource

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by janeriordan, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. I have a Nursery/Reception Class of 20. Within the class there are a number of disruptive children who are spoiling things for everyone else. The usual school sanctions do not seem to phase them at all. We have a large intake joining us in the Summer term so are keen to have our current class working well and, to this end, are considering some form of visual behaviour system.

    We have looked at other local schools and the most popular seem to be traffic lights or weather symbols - sun for good behaviour, going down through white cloud, unhappy sun and rain cloud - with sanctions of time out within the classroom or missing 'golden time'. Our routine allows the children to choose between the continuous provision areas when they are not working with an adult, which means we don't have a 'golden time' as such, other than on a Friday afternoon when we do 'Plan, Do, Review'.

    My Head is not keen to build up behaviour sanctions over a week and I agree with him, we think that each day should be a fresh start.

    Does anyone use something along these lines? I am keen to make it more about positive reinforcement of the good behaviour than constantly being negative about the bad, because I do have most of the children behaving well and becoming increasingly frustrated with those who don't.
     
  2. I have a Nursery/Reception Class of 20. Within the class there are a number of disruptive children who are spoiling things for everyone else. The usual school sanctions do not seem to phase them at all. We have a large intake joining us in the Summer term so are keen to have our current class working well and, to this end, are considering some form of visual behaviour system.

    We have looked at other local schools and the most popular seem to be traffic lights or weather symbols - sun for good behaviour, going down through white cloud, unhappy sun and rain cloud - with sanctions of time out within the classroom or missing 'golden time'. Our routine allows the children to choose between the continuous provision areas when they are not working with an adult, which means we don't have a 'golden time' as such, other than on a Friday afternoon when we do 'Plan, Do, Review'.

    My Head is not keen to build up behaviour sanctions over a week and I agree with him, we think that each day should be a fresh start.

    Does anyone use something along these lines? I am keen to make it more about positive reinforcement of the good behaviour than constantly being negative about the bad, because I do have most of the children behaving well and becoming increasingly frustrated with those who don't.
     
  3. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    Is it possible to have individual behaviour plans for each disruptive child? We have children collecting stickers on a chart and then earning a time-related treat. But I only have 2 that have difficulties! It would be more difficult with lots. We do have a class reward for good sitting and listening that accumulates into a "party" - I pinched that idea off someone else on TES ages ago and it works really well in terms of peer pressure.
     
  4. When I taught YR I had a weather chart system. All children started on the sun- going down as you suggested to clouds. I also had a rainbow above the sun they could move up to with a reward- stickers, marbles in a jar etc so that the children who were persistantly good had their rewards (or if the frequent offenders had a good day they could see it working for them!)
    Could you have a daily reward e.g. those who are on the sun/rainbow/green light etc get a small treat at the end of the day- choose a favourite story, watch Charlie and Lola on Cbeebies, sing a favourite action rhyme, play an ict game on IWB, 10 minute circle game etc. Something the whole class can do together that is small, fun and manageable. The offenders who have got onto a red light/thunder cloud etc could spend that time in 'time out' in another space (if you have one!) with another adult (if you have one!).
    It would perhaps bring it home more than time out in a corner of the classroom where they can still see what's going on and then they can go back to whatever they were doing anyway.

    Just a thought...
     
  5. We have done that in the past for an individual child. We encouraged the whole class to take responsibility for helping him behave and then when he had completed his chart we had a whole class treat. It did work the first time, but then Mum came in and said that he didn't want to do the chart any more as he felt it focused on him too much. Needless to say he is one of the ones who now need some kind of programme!

    We tried it again with another little chap but I think he was just too young to grasp the concept or just wasn't bothered and after a term he still hadn't managed to complete his chart, so it rather lost it's ummph.

    I agree that the whole class approach is a good one because then it also rewards the consistently good children. However we are using that approach to introduce each new Habit of Mind this year, with the class having a whole class treat once everyone has demonstrated use of the new HoM. We will have to limit how many whole class treats we plan or it will be party after party!

    Thank you for your response, I really don't use this forum enough; it is so good for getting other ideas.
     
  6. Thank you for your suggestions. They are along the lines of what I was thinking, it is just the logistics of things. Unfortunately my TA finishes 15 minutes before the end of the school day (budget!) but I have an NVQ L3 student with me for the rest of the term, whom is very capable and who could either supervise the reward or the time out.

    As to the rewards, I hadn't thought of a DVD or CBeebies but that would certainly be a huge incentive to be good. We aren't lucky enough to have an IWB within our class, so anything visual is very popular.

    I also really like the idea of the rainbow as something above the sun for all those children who are the stalwarts of the class but who often don't get recognition. We have a 'treasure box' for dipping into when they have managed to finish all their Continuous Provision challenges which could also be used for rainbow rewards.

    Many thanks - off to put some Charlie and Lola etc into my Amazon basket!
     
  7. It's the beginning of the school year here in Australia. I have been back at school with Reception kids for just 2 weeks. There is a bunch of kids who are not 'with the programme' and are a challenge every day. Two were extremely loud and boisterous and still are BUT their parents are on board after i had a 'chat' with them, explaining how much I loved their child's spirit but I have to cater for all. I asked for their support - and they give it. Just checking with me on appropriate behaviour each day makes the child realise that we are all heading in the same direction. Having said that I now give positive rewards for them because I am assured that those parents want to work with me and want good outcomes from the school system. I report the positive stuff and we all feel good.On the other hand I also have a child who is a real challenge. His parents are well aware that he is demanding in school; he was at nursery, and childcare. He will need an Individual Behaviour Programme so that his parents and the school can work together. It's not about him and me; it's much broader - about the school system, parenting, expectations in different environments and how to meet his needs without letting him be the only person who determines them. Being positive is one thing BUT it can never be one-sided. And let's face it, if we, as teachers, feel we are able to work with parents for the good of the child we feel more positive. If we hit a wall, everything is a hard challenge.
     

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