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Vertical Tutoring as a change to learning culture for school improvement

Discussion in 'Governors' started by legbreak, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. I have noticed how many schools change to a Vertical Tutoring (VT) culture (from Year to House in effect) by copying other schools often passing on poor practice often based on erroneous assumptions. Governing Bodies are left entirely in the dark (as are untrained and poorly prepared staff) for what should be a liberating and whole school improvement process. Behind VT is a deep knowledge base about management, leadership and systems thinking. There are now around 900 schools that have adopted VT (a number increasing fast), half of which show uncertainty and ignorance in what VT is and how it works to improve teaching and learning; many have made matters worse not better but would never admit this.
    Because of what I see as the damage being done to a good idea and to schools, I offer free support and advice to governing bodies and Leadership Teams re such whole school change. Just as leadership teams are poorly placed to embark on such a sophisticated change without support, so are supportive Governing Bodies. In many ways I have found GBs to be better placed than LTs in their management understanding of the fundamentals of VT.
    My question is this: how can governors understand more fully the management and training needs of teachers and play a better support role?
     
  2. I have noticed how many schools change to a Vertical Tutoring (VT) culture (from Year to House in effect) by copying other schools often passing on poor practice often based on erroneous assumptions. Governing Bodies are left entirely in the dark (as are untrained and poorly prepared staff) for what should be a liberating and whole school improvement process. Behind VT is a deep knowledge base about management, leadership and systems thinking. There are now around 900 schools that have adopted VT (a number increasing fast), half of which show uncertainty and ignorance in what VT is and how it works to improve teaching and learning; many have made matters worse not better but would never admit this.
    Because of what I see as the damage being done to a good idea and to schools, I offer free support and advice to governing bodies and Leadership Teams re such whole school change. Just as leadership teams are poorly placed to embark on such a sophisticated change without support, so are supportive Governing Bodies. In many ways I have found GBs to be better placed than LTs in their management understanding of the fundamentals of VT.
    My question is this: how can governors understand more fully the management and training needs of teachers and play a better support role?
     
  3. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    I think this is little more than a puff piece for your Consultancy company which exists solely to promote VT, as anyone can read about by clicking your screen name and reading your Profile. Claiming to offer 'free support and advice' isn't how your website describes your courses. It says £300 per person. I happened to be with my Head and SLT earlier this afternoon and asked them what they thought of VT. They've nothing against VT as such but thought the idea that experienced scondary school leaders would need an expensive consultant to tell them how to introduce it plain absurd.
    And why would governors need to be trained in this? Clearly a matter of internal management and organisation of the school, and so a responsibility of the headteacher.
    Just out of curiousity are you saying that there are 900 state secondary schools in the UK using VT - somewhere between a 25% and 30% depending whether you mean England only or the whole UK? Can you provide a link to the source of that data?
    And what's the source of the your "half of which show uncertainty and ignorance in what VT is...." data?
    I'm not opposed to VT by the way - used successfully at last school I was COG at - just don't like to see the governors' forum used for commercial promotions.
     
  4. I've worked in several schools with vertical tutoring and found it to be a huge success. Giving it one term and then giving up perhaps suggests it wasn't given enough time for the culture shift.
     
  5. montiagh

    montiagh New commenter

    You have to listen to your customers!
     
  6. Not sure about that one when dealing with teenagers! Sometimes we do know best!
    Vertical tutoring isn't perfect and children are obviously going to moan about it because they're much less likely to be with their friends. This is natural but in my experience the benefits of vertical tutoring far outweigh the disadvantages.
     
  7. Hi Rott...free training anytime, anywhere. You misread my website. So, let's see how much you know. Better still, I'll pay you if you're willing to join in. Give me a call... Systems thinking will help...promise
     
  8. Montiagh. I bet you your school tried to copy another school or offered staff poor or no training. This is a leadership mess-up and not uncommon. People assume this is all easy stuff but there is much psych and systems thinking needed to make it work well. Invite me over and I'll talk you thru all that went wrong and precisely why...No Charge
     
  9. By the way, you didn't get the T shirt. Not even close. Let me help you at least understand it rather than assume you do. Of course you won't, (or) will youThere are around 1000 schools doing VT and about 500 doing it well!! Approximate figures.
     

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