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Variety is the key to attracting new teachers

Discussion in 'Education news' started by Shedman, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. Shedman

    Shedman Star commenter

    https://www.tes.com/news/professor-who-wants-help-teachers-stay-course

    “There is something we need to learn about my kids’ generation who are current graduates – that there is more of an expectation of a more varied career,” she says. “The idea that you go into a school and stay in that school and do the same job forever is pretty out of date, I think.”


    Sheffield Hallam has changed its approach to trainee recruitment after considering this point. “Previously, with open days we would have quite quickly started to explain all the different options and different courses, but instead we concentrated on getting a role model in – it was the new principal of the Astrea Academy in Sheffield [Kim Walton].

    “We asked her to come and be inspiring and what she did was really brilliant. She talked about all the different opportunities that she'd had to do lots of different things. While being a teacher or senior leader, she had been to all these different countries, she had led all sorts of different things and had worked with different employers, and it just showed what a variety you can have within the profession.”

    Twiselton is now looking to build on this idea through the Partnerships for Attainment project, which has brought together teacher-training providers across South Yorkshire.

    “We have been asking ‘is it possible for you to have more variety in your post in a region if the region works to make it possible to spend time in other people’s schools?" she says. "So could you be working in a class for four days a week and then be specialising in a particular thing that takes you to other schools on the fifth?

    “For me, that would have kept me in the profession. I left after five years – not because I hated it, but because I was ready for a change and I'd had a baby and was ready to work part-time."

    I really am at a loss here. Has this woman any idea about what goes on in schools these days? She talks of the 'role model' she invited to speak to students at an open day:

    She talked about all the different opportunities that she'd had to do lots of different things. While being a teacher or senior leader, she had been to all these different countries, she had led all sorts of different things and had worked with different employers, and it just showed what a variety you can have within the profession.”


    Which schools are going to send teachers (except perhaps SLT) on freebies to other countries? Of course she would have led lots of things because that's what teachers are roped in for and she has worked for lots of different employers because she's changed jobs often to climb the greasy pole. This is just part and parcel of a teaching career.

    When Twiselton says:

    “We have been asking ‘is it possible for you to have more variety in your post in a region if the region works to make it possible to spend time in other people’s schools?" she says. "So could you be working in a class for four days a week and then be specialising in a particular thing that takes you to other schools on the fifth?

    Did the whole Advanced Skills Teacher initiative pass her by? And what school in these financially hard pressed times is going to pay for a teacher to be out of school one day per week?

    Might I suggest that instead of offering our new teachers 'variety', a decent salary, well resourced schools and an end to the Ofsted and league table culture may be a bigger draw.

    Reading Twiselton's CV you will note that she only actually taught for 5 years and that was 24 years ago! It figures.
     
    ViolaClef, slstrong123, Ezzie and 7 others like this.
  2. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    I would have enjoyed this - but it would have been a touch day dream land.
    I did get to visit interesting places, but while responsible for a group of teenagers.
     
    Shedman and blazer like this.
  3. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    There has been quite an increase in this type of news piece in TES recently. If you read it carefully, it says next to nothing, and is anyone else very much disturbed by the rather bizarrely framed photos? The poses look like they should belong in a glamour magazine, with a far younger model doing the poses. But with a much older person doing them, they just become disturbing.

    One major thing that education can benefit greatly from is less frequent ‘news’ being reported. Trying to churn out education stories day after day just isn’t sustainable because frankly, there just isn’t enough news to report. You end up with newspieces like this very poor piece of writing, reporting about nothing, with photos that certainly are appropriate for this time of year (Halloween) but little else.

    We would all benefit if “news” was reported every fortnight or every month rather than daily.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  4. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    Twiselton is a brilliant name.

    Quite Dickensian.
     
    TCSC47, Shedman, agathamorse and 2 others like this.
  5. install

    install Star commenter

    It seems : She basically did classroom teaching for 6/7 years then moved on. A nice sucessful story out of the classroom - using the word 'variety' instead of the phrase 'change of job'.

    In Gov't and Curriculum terms 'variety' has been force fed to teachers through swinging changes over the years. Even down to teachers being made accountable for poorly behaved students; cutting back pay; no mobility pay in places; and poor support from some hts and ceos.

    'Variety' has led to teachers being worse paid than nurses and police per hr. No Union rights in places and worse. The point that teachers now pay 36000 pounds to get trained only to earn less is also missed.

    With people working possibly up to 70- of course they may have several jobs. But they need more respect, rights and pay. This is old news.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  6. moscowbore

    moscowbore Occasional commenter

    Variety is the key. Absolute nonsense. A decent wage and getting rid of academies and the attitude which goes with them would be a good start.
     
  7. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    I still see that you cannot comment on these articles unless you use facebook. Why is that?
     
  8. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    I never tire of being told how teaching can be improved by people who no longer teach.
     
    TCSC47, bevdex, agathamorse and 6 others like this.
  9. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    funny how when I started I learnt the most from the teachers who had done essentially the same job for years. All massively respected by the parents and the teenagers that we taught. All confident in their role and their job.
     
  10. Shedman

    Shedman Star commenter

    Oh no, no, no! What you say might be the case hammie but these days good teaching as by SLT is perpetual change in techniques, presentation and strategy. You may be an expert practitioner who has taught in the same way for donkey's years and the kids may actually learn stuff but this doesn't give the impression of 'moving forward', 'challenging and stretching students' and so on does it? It doesn't matter if the teaching's cra P the fact that you're doing something new and different is what matters.

    You can teach in the same old way you used to as long as you can convince everyone that you've been teaching in all these other methods for so long that your traditional style is actually your new style and then everything will be hunky dory.
     
  11. install

    install Star commenter

    I agree.

    Experience, longevity and reliance - all attributes of a teachers that do the job day in day out. Of course, the ageist attitude that seems to exist in teaching these days is also a problem. And if 'variety' means 'gets rid of teachers who have done 5 yrs teaching' in some schools then no wonder there are problems.

    Teaching doesn't need 'variety' - it needs experienced,.reliable and respected teachers. And a society that backs them.:cool:
     
  12. scilady

    scilady New commenter

    The key to attracting and KEEPING top graduates is to sort out behaviour. People want to teach the kids their great subjects not bring them up, and sort society's problems
     
  13. schoolsout4summer

    schoolsout4summer Lead commenter

    In other areas of life experience is valued, but not in Schools.
    There are no doubt a variety of reasons for this, but one of them is that inexperienced but ambitious Management are now running businesses, where profit is king. Therefore every cost incurred must be the lowest price - including staffing costs.
    Never mind the bullocks, most schools are not what they were.
     
  14. Shedman

    Shedman Star commenter

    https://www.tes.com/news/exclusive-scripted-lessons-dont-allow-teachers-excel

    This 'academic' is at it again this time speaking of scripted lessons:

    The head of a major teacher training provider has questioned the value of scripted lessons which direct what teachers should say in lessons.

    Professor Sam Twiselton, the director of Sheffield Institute of Education at Sheffield Hallam University has said that for teachers to improve they need to learn to be flexible and responsive.

    She told Tes she had concerns about lesson plans that dictate exactly what a teacher should say to pupils.


    Last year Tes reported evidence of how scripted lessons in schools were on the rise and have been promoted by several high-profile academy trusts.

    These can vary between a fully scripted lesson to a sequence of learning which a teacher can work.

    Prof Twiselton said: “I have heard in the most extreme cases this means literally reading from a script.

    I despair of this woman! So teachers need to be 'flexible and responsive' to be able to improve. Before teachers splutter into their coffee on reading this old garbage, what does she think teachers do in classrooms every lesson, every day?

    If you see you have lost the class, you're going too fast or the students just aren't getting it you think on your feet and adapt what you are doing or revisit previous ideas. For her to suggest that teachers just plough on regardless is insulting to the whole teaching profession. What evidence does she have? Absolutely none!

    Prof Twiselton said: “I have heard in the most extreme cases this means literally reading from a script.

    In other words she publishing this bilge on the strength of hearsay.

    She goes on:

    “With scripted lessons. I haven’t seen it in action and I need to but my own personal research which looked at student teachers doing their initial teacher education suggests to me in order to become more expert you need to become more flexible not less flexible.

    Well how trivial, trite and banal is that comment?

    Prof Twiselton, your comments in both of these recent articles are ill-founded, lacking evidence and are not based on first-hand experience. You are undermining your professional standing with your facile outpourings as well as bringing offence and despair to classroom teachers. Please, just shut up!
     
    agathamorse and TCSC47 like this.
  15. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    I wonder how some professors became professors. But more bizarrely is how some professors who churn out junk theories they call research, based on their very limited personal observations of their own student teachers, remain professors. Surely, being a prof shouldn’t be a one way thing. Fair enough if they get the title, but they should be subject to Performance Management each year, so if they are caught cruising by spewing out toilet paper “research”, they should be downgraded and have the ‘Prof’ title removed.

    PS I am still very troubled by the third photo in the Prof Twiselton article. It just makes me unhappy, ill and anxious. It is simply not an appropriate photo for an article commenting on the problems teachers face, even if those comments are totally misguided.

    https://www.tes.com/news/professor-who-wants-help-teachers-stay-course
     
    agathamorse, Sir_Henry and Shedman like this.
  16. Shedman

    Shedman Star commenter

    It does look more like a 'come hither' photo from a dating website. I would have been a lot happier if the photos had shown her teaching pupils or even just in a school! She's obviously completely out of touch with the day to day reality of teaching a class.
     
    agathamorse, TCSC47 and Sir_Henry like this.
  17. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    What an embarrassing article.
     
  18. Shedman

    Shedman Star commenter

    Yes but it fills space on the website and in the magazine while patronising teachers at the same time. I suppose when 'Prof' Twiselton has her performance management review she can quote the publication of these articles as a justification for her inflated professorial salary hoping that no one on the governing body actually reads the garbage she produces.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  19. Shedman

    Shedman Star commenter

    I've just looked up 'Prof' Twiselton on her university website and looked at her publications:

    upload_2018-11-10_13-1-51.png

    Er… I make that one book in the last 7 years and that was co-authored by 6 others. What has this woman been doing to justify her salary?

    I note that the first entry on the list is 'Doing Classroom Research'. Oh the delicious irony of it all!
     
  20. baxterbasics

    baxterbasics Senior commenter

    I read what she had to say.

    It was a complete load of tripe.
     
    Shedman likes this.

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