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Value added - Who is responsible?

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by twiggybear, Jun 7, 2011.


  1. Hi I am currently studying a MA in education and have been researching value added models for further education currently utilised in the UK. As a teaching professional myself predicting a student achievement level is a task I encounter on a daily basis. In America VA models have been employed for a number of years. Here it has been argued that pay scales, incentives and consequences should be set holding academic staff responsible for overall success rates. What do you feel about this? Do you think other factors influence overall student success rates?
    Are we ready to be challenged? – What do you feel would be the consequences?
    I would really appreciate your input!
    Thanks!
     

  2. Hi I am currently studying a MA in education and have been researching value added models for further education currently utilised in the UK. As a teaching professional myself predicting a student achievement level is a task I encounter on a daily basis. In America VA models have been employed for a number of years. Here it has been argued that pay scales, incentives and consequences should be set holding academic staff responsible for overall success rates. What do you feel about this? Do you think other factors influence overall student success rates?
    Are we ready to be challenged? – What do you feel would be the consequences?
    I would really appreciate your input!
    Thanks!
     
  3. Georgia99

    Georgia99 New commenter

    I have mixed views. Student success rates can be influenced by much more than the teacher e.g. home life-support from parents, conditions at home, how intrinsically motivated a student is including how likely the are to complete self study and whether they really value the subject they are taking as having any future value. The background and area where the student lives can have a huge impact e.g. what are their friends and families views on education, what have they been encouraged to aspire to?
    But teachers can help foster intrinsic motivation by creating purposeful learning environments and creative learning activities. Teacher enthusiasm and support can have a huge impact, a terrible teacher should not be rewarded when an outstanding one can achieve much better results.
    But a generic system of awarding for student achievement would not be good. I have worked in two schools over my pgce course, the first rated as satisfactory with average teachers but in a middle classed rural area and GCSE attainment is high. My second placement is an outstanding school with outstanding teachers but is in a deprived inner city area and GCSE attainment grades are very low. You cannot compare the two for achievement because of the background of the students and the satisfactory teachers are getting better results than the outstanding ones because of the type of students that they are teaching. Those teachers are doing great work for disadvantaged students, an incentive system might encourage them to take the easy route and go to work with kids from priviledged backgrounds who don't need the support.

     

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