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Value added measure

Discussion in 'Assessment' started by smiler1234uk, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. I'll post this here as well as in Primary just wondered if anyone could post in lamens terms if possible how to work out the value added measure for key stage 1 - 2?

    Thanks
     
  2. Wera6

    Wera6 New commenter

    I believe Average Point Score (APS) at KS2 minus APS of KS1 = value added
     
  3. imc

    imc

    This wouldn't account for above or below average progress.
    Roughly speaking, anything above average progress is the 'added value'. So if a child left KS1 with a 2b and they leave KS2 with a 4a then the VA would be 1 sub-level (2 points). This isover simplified as the govenment has complicated average progress tables to make the conversions e.g. pupils at 2a are expected to get a 5c at KS2. Also pupils with a level 3 or level 1 at KS1 are given the point equivalent of 3v or 1b respectively and so any KS1 level 3s should get a 5b+ at KS2.
    Since the introduction of the 2 levels progress floor targets at KS2 VA seems to have had less of a mention.
    P.S. CVA (Contextual Value Added) is a whole different board game with conversions which take postcode, ethnicity, FSM etc. into the equation)

     
  4. T34

    T34 Established commenter

    Yes, I think that is more like the accepted meaning.
    It seems to be a difference of a difference - how much the KS1 - KS2 difference (for example) differs from something else (X). What that something else is needs to be defined if the term "VA" is going to have any worthwhile meaning.
    in general, at end of KS2) for example, VA = X - (KS2 - KS1)
    For CVA, the number X depends on the "type" of the children involved.

     
  5. banjouk

    banjouk New commenter

    Value Added = KS2 points - (KS1 points + 12 points)
    eg KS2 Maths 4b (27pts) - (KS1 Maths 2a (17pts) + 12pts = 29pts) = minus 2 Overall
    To work out fine levels from KS2 Sats you will need to wait until the grade boundaries are released for the raw scores.
    CVA is going, so don't worry about that.

     
  6. Unless you work in a school with tons of deprivation...if you work in the leafy urbs or rich rural environs the new system of 60% floor targets and 2 levels progress means a lot of the pressure is off.
    The best way of calculating good progress from KS1 to KS2 is to base it on 2 sub-level progress and use APS as the av. measure. Thus: any child that makes more than 12 points progress over the 4 years has made good progress, this can also be rolled out to cohorts/groups/individuals/age range etc, etc, etc.........
    Thus, if your average points score was 15(2b) at end KS1 and your aps is 28 at end ks2 that's good progress, because it's above nat av, at present. Making 3.5 + aps a year would be outstanding progress. Thus 15 points would become 29 points, of course this would have to be tied into numbers of children achieving 12 points blah, blah, blah.......
    Basically theirs damn right lies and statistics, choose the measure that has the best outcome for your school and flog it!
     
  7. T34

    T34 Established commenter

    How do you mean, exactly - "going"?
     
  8. banjouk

    banjouk New commenter

    From the end of the year CVA will not be used as an offical performance measure, we are going back to value added.
     
  9. A level playing field for all, now let's watch the data manipulators work their magic with KS1, I can now watch all my local cream puff heads boasting about how good their school is, based on dubious data. I think they all credit their success to regular working from home days!!!!!!!!
     
  10. T34

    T34 Established commenter

    Mmm..
    You can't get away from "contextual" for value added because it is worked out using that number 'X' (for which you use '12').
    If the '12' is the average points gain over KS2 calculated using all the primary schools in the country then the context of the value added so worked out is the national cohort.
    Why on earth have people opted to get rid of using schools of their own type as the context (the so-called CVA)?
    Schools with a low ability intake will come out looking worse - the playing field is no longer levelled.


     
  11. Wera6

    Wera6 New commenter

    Wasn't CVA more concerned with % Free School Meals, Ethnicity, first language etc?
    I thought that the concept of Value Added originally came about to enable schools to get away from comparing just the raw 'Achievement' of a given level (like 4 at KS2) so that they could show the 'progress' the children had made - the 'value' the school had added. This then came to be achievement of anything over and above the expected progress (12 points) which morphed into CVA when low achieving schools wanted to make the point that it was levels of deprivation which was limiting the adding of value. It seems that the method of calculating CVA has not been as successful as had been hoped which is why I thought it was being shelved.


     
  12. As against those schools without any level of deprivation who made little progess, but had high attainment !
    CVA came about to show how schools performed given their setting, and suddely those schools in "nice areas" had something to worry about. Let's face it, progess is what matters, take care of that and attaiment takes care of its self!
     
  13. T34

    T34 Established commenter

    True.
    And, we haven't discarded CVA. We have just decided on a new method of calculating it...
    1) "VA" should be simply (KS2 APS - KS1 APS), because that is indeed the "Value" that the school has added. As soon as you start subtracting or dividing that number by some other number derived from a context, whatever that context is, then it becomes "CVA", and if we continue to call it "VA" after this mathematical manipulation, we are misnaming it.
    2) "CVA", in its usual form, was introduced to give every school a chance. Instead of the achievement of your pupils being compared with the average achievement of all pupils they are compared with the average achievement of pupils of their own category (age, ethnicity, EFL, etc). So, conceivably, Gas Street Primary could come top of the CVA league tables.
    A downside of CVA is that it might lead to setting too low targets for some children. They tend to perform acording to the expectations applied to them.
    On the other hand, setting a target of, say, two sub levels progress per year for every child is a bit silly, and can only lead to further lack of faith in the whole concept of target setting.

     
  14. banjouk

    banjouk New commenter

    I'm going to disagree with you. Value Added is what progress a school adds or subtracts to a child's education from the nationally expected rate of 1 point per term and this hasn’t changed for as long as I’ve worked in education (15+ years). Contextual refers to some of the factors on the this list shown below (DfE stats), whose coefficients have changed every year to reflect the changes in the previous year’s results.

    Context 2010 Value Coefficient
    free school meal flag F 0
    free school meal flag T -0.374
    In care at current school F 0
    In care at current school T 0.205
    A -1.217
    N 0
    P -2.01
    S -2.01
    pupil joined during Yr 6 MOB1 -0.485
    pupil joined during Yr 5 MOB2 -0.26
    pupil joined during Yr3-4 MOB3 -0.165
    M 0
    F -0.344
    English as an additional language ENB 0
    English as an additional language ENG 0
    English as an additional language OTB 1.827
    English as an additional language OTH 1.827
    The list goes on with over 100 coefficents that have to be totted up to work out a child's/schools CVA.
     
  15. T34

    T34 Established commenter

    Thanks for the info.
     
  16. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    The government does not (and no previous government has) refer to sub-levels. There is no 2a or 5c, only level 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc.
    Schools use these because they like to measure progress regularly but there is no universally recognised system for sub-levelling
     
  17. banjouk

    banjouk New commenter

    I think you may be mistaken. Each year the one of the following (QCA/QCDA) runs moderation training for LA's. This drills down to the sub level, i.e. a group task of levelling 10 sample writing papers of different abilities.

    The range of levels that can be used for these papers for KS1 are 1, 2C, 2B, 2A, 3, 4 with P levels recorded separately (KS1 ARA 2011).

    The KS2 (SATs) Tests and TA’s are whole levels but the QCDA does produce fine level boundary grades after the results have been released.


     
  18. Wera6

    Wera6 New commenter

    Do you have a link for these?
     
  19. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Show me where the government literature is on National Curriculum sub levels please. I don't think you will be able to.
     
  20. imc

    imc

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