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Using Music in Lessons

Discussion in 'English' started by mediadave, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. mediadave

    mediadave New commenter

    Does anyone use music much in their lessons? If so, could you say what you use it for an what effect is has?
    I ask because I've read a few articles recently about using music in the classroom but I wonder how best to make it fit into English lessons without it seeming gimmicky.
     
  2. mediadave

    mediadave New commenter

    Does anyone use music much in their lessons? If so, could you say what you use it for an what effect is has?
    I ask because I've read a few articles recently about using music in the classroom but I wonder how best to make it fit into English lessons without it seeming gimmicky.
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Yes I have used music in the past. Worked with Maths & Art colleagues who regularly used music, especially to aid concentration and keep noise level down.
    For example at the end of a unit on Gothic Horror, when drafting and writing their (internal) assessment pieces of work. I had a Powerpoint, on a loop, with Gothic graphics and a CD of matching music. Helped children get into the 'mood' or focus their attention if they got stuck.
    Sometimes eg Fri afternoons 9when concebtration lacking), have allowed a 'treat' of listening to the radio-channel of their choice, IF they get on with their work- if they didn't or obviously weren't listening the radio went off!
     
  4. y9840125

    y9840125 Occasional commenter

    I use music at the start of every lesson to set the mood but this is easily incorporated into prezi which is what i use for my lessons.
     
  5. anteater

    anteater New commenter

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  6. I use music all the time, particularly as a hook to engage students as they enter. Yesterday played 'God save the queen' (Sex Pistols) as an introduction to The Clown Punk.
    Was suddenly shifted to a music room last week so pulled out a box of percussion instruments and students each selected one and their peers wrote down descriptions or representations of the sounds in preparation for a descriptive piece.
    This also works well with The Tempest the island being full of sweet sounds etc.
    Sometimes I use a popular track as a timer to complete a short task.

     
  7. jarndyce

    jarndyce Occasional commenter

    I haven't, and have no plans to. I have allowed a difficult Year 11 class to listen to their ipods when getting on with individual work. I'm more concerned about students for whom music will be a distraction, as it always was for me - and musical tastes (most likely mine and theirs)! will differ.
     
  8. I have used music for all sorts of reasons in my English lessons. To set the tone of the sort of response I'm looking for. Busy baroque music - claming down etc.
    Music to work to - nothing with words in it - music to clear up to - change of music to signal finish task and hand it in.
    Use songs a lot - text deconstruction - rewriting the lyrics - what does this lyric actually mean (try Leonard Cohen - First we take Manhattan)
    And just like I want students to appreciate and know about a variety of literary genres - I do the same with music - and instruments - jazz - easy listening - Mozart - plainsong - they got the lot!

     
  9. use music all the time, particularly as a hook to engage students as they enter. Yesterday played 'God save the queen' (Sex Pistols) as an introduction to The Clown Punk.
    ------------------
    Debra Fine
     
  10. My year sevens last term loved it!
    I use music as a timer sometimes- when planning a story about an escape, I used the theme from The Great Escape. Roughly 5 minutes, and loops quite nicely! Plus, I found it kept noise levels in a chatty group down
     
  11. y9840125

    y9840125 Occasional commenter

    It's the new power point www.prezi.com
     
  12. armandine2

    armandine2 Established commenter

    I heard Radio 4 last night, 'Poetry Please' some of the readings started with cool sung versions which morphed into the lovey poets. It didn't work, but maybe it would have done with Carla Bruni.
     
  13. I regularly use music when looking at sentence structure or grammatical areas.
    I recently used a few mashups I downloaded from Youtube as the basis for my lesson. I played 3 different mashups, all using bits from Justin Bieber songs, but the 3rd one was a mix of Justin Bieber and Slipknot.("Psychosocial Baby" if you're interested). It went down a storm!
    I gave them the lyrics and we looked at the various structures and tenses used, discussed new vocabulary, talked about the meaning of the lyrics, and by the end of the class, I had them singing along with it... even the ones who didn't like it were singing along with the chorus!
    I've also used Iron Maiden, Anthrax, Nine Inch Nails, Queen, Nickleback, and lots of other rock / metal bands, but I've also given them Ella Fitzgerald, Elvis Presley, Garth Brooks... a wide range of genres.
    It makes for a lively lesson... something completely different to the norm... and the students seem to appreciate it.
     
  14. Facetious

    Facetious New commenter

    I use music quite a bit, but only in brief episodes. I play snippets of Frankie Goes to Hollywood's Two Tribes (Annihilation Mix) when we cover imperatives, as it includes an updated version of the old 'protect and survive' Government broadcasts. I've also played clips from Fireworks and Forget You, so that the pupils could identify metaphors and explain what they were suggesting. I put together a dozen songs that my KS4 pupils need to associate with the dreams of the characters in Of Mice and Men - there are no right answers, as long as they can justify their choices. In a poetry scheme, I end it by asking pupils to bring in song lyrics and apply all that they have learnt to their chosen song, writing an essay style answer. Sometimes I play a track associated with the lesson and ask the pupils coming in what they think the lesson will be about.
    To be honest, I just use any excuse possible to play music. :)
     
  15. CarolineEm

    CarolineEm New commenter

    If class are being sluggish about getting a quick task done, I play the Mission Impossible theme which galvanizes them all. But I wouldn't use if I didn't know that I could get control back when needed, as it does make some of them pretty hyper (esp ADHD pupils!)
     

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