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US or UK better for teachers?

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by frtrd, Aug 28, 2012.

  1. I'm trying to decide which country I should get my certification/credential in. Which do you think is better in terms of salary, job market, work/life balance, and respect for the profession? Thanks!
     
  2. I'm trying to decide which country I should get my certification/credential in. Which do you think is better in terms of salary, job market, work/life balance, and respect for the profession? Thanks!
     
  3. I think for the US, it depends on which state you are living in.
     
  4. whatshername

    whatshername New commenter

    I'm an American taking my Overseas PGCE to teach secondary English. I chose the British system due to the emphasis on practical writing, analysis and critical thinking skills incorporated into the English curriculum which is lacking in the American one, as there is no unified American curriculum. While they both have standardized testing (the US testing system varies by state), the American tests tend to be of the anti-thought multiple choice variety. As the teachers are encouraged to teach in order for their students to pass the test, they regularly have to sacrifice teaching more valuable skills to teaching to the test. While British teachers also have standardized tests, their tests tend to measure skills which can be taught a variety of ways and is less restrictive for the teachers, in my opinion. That's not to say that I think that the standardized testing in the UK is perfect, it's just not as bad as the American system.


    American schools vary a great deal by state. Each state has different teacher certification, standardized testing, and curriculum. My mom is an primary teacher currently working in a charter school in Florida. It's a better than average school with a curriculum focused on project-based learning with relatively small class sizes. She had to take a pay cut and beat out hundreds of other applicants to get the job, though. Many US states have very limited budgets at the moment and many schools in Florida have a hiring freeze. Florida had a population boom (mostly from people moving to Florida) about fifteen years ago when many schools were packed - population figures have contracted since which is resulting in some schools closing and fewer teaching jobs to be had.



    If I were you I'd look into parts of America where you'd like to live and google "teaching in [state]".
     
  5. Are you secondary (years 7 to 13, grades 6 to 12) or primary?
     
  6. Thanks for the insight. Would you mind sharing what program you are completing your PGCE with?
     
  7. Secondary!
     
  8. At this point most states are moving towards common core, so there will be a more cohesive set of standards
     
  9. whatshername

    whatshername New commenter

    I'm doing the Uni Sunderland OSPGCE.
     
  10. If you ever decide to go overseas (outside the US or UK), I would choose to get my certification in the US. American schools overseas tend to be more numerous and also seem to provide somewhat better working conditions and benefits. Also I find the less hierarchical nature of the American management system to be a pleasant surprise after the top down orders I received at the previous British school. Finally, there seems to be a lot more for-profit British schools overseas (selling the good names of those top Public schools) compared to American schools. Most of the Brits I know in American schools are quite happy and once they get used to dealing with Americans, are reluctant to move back to the British system.
     

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