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URGENT - behaviour management of upper KS2

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by rugby_gal06, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. I am going into upper KS2 tomorrow on supply and need an armful of ideas to help with behaviour management. My experience is with KS1, so many of the strategies that I normally use just don't work with older children - as I found out last week.
    Which strategies do you use to get the children to be quiet for example?
    Any tips/advice you can offer would be much appreciated.
    Thank you.
     
  2. I am going into upper KS2 tomorrow on supply and need an armful of ideas to help with behaviour management. My experience is with KS1, so many of the strategies that I normally use just don't work with older children - as I found out last week.
    Which strategies do you use to get the children to be quiet for example?
    Any tips/advice you can offer would be much appreciated.
    Thank you.
     
  3. flickaz

    flickaz New commenter

    1) Children are like dogs...they can sense when you're scared. Whatever you do, try your hardest to maintain a calm exterior.
    2) Upper KS2 are still open to bribery. Losing breaktime, winning raffle tickets for a small prize etc
    3) Start the day harsher than you normal would. Start your expectations early. They line up in silence etc. It's always easier to get nicer throughout the day but if you lose them first thing then you've got no chance.
     
  4. bigpig

    bigpig New commenter

    Upper KS2 are quite good with peer pressure. Threatening them with them ALL staying in at play, making them all sit in silence. They'll soon start telling each other to be quiet. Well that's what I've found.
     
  5. To get them to stop and listen I tend to say loudly 1,2,3, stop, look, listen. The children have to stop, look, listen and hold up 3 fingers (explain this and have a practice first thing after register). Praise those children who are doing the right thing.
    If there's a TA in the class it's also worth asking how their teacher normally stops them - if children are used to a system they respond quickly to it.
    I use raffle tickets as rewards - it's amazing how quickly a table will tidy up if you say that the best table will all get a raffle ticket. The children write their names on the back of a raffle ticket (given for good behaviour, good effort, good work), and put it in a container. At the end of the day I pull 2 or 3 raffle tickets out of the box and those children get to choose a small prize (pound shop bargains).
    Use lots of praise for children doing the right thing, but don't take any messing. Ensure you know the school rewards and sanctions - sometimes just giving a warning and stating what the sanctions are encourages children to do the right thing.
    If the whole class is very noisy and won't respond to requests for quiet - I would explain that the whole class will have to practice sitting quietly at break time if they can't do this during class time. Usually works a treat!
    Good luck - it is different in KS2 but can be a lot of fun!



     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I do not agree with whole class punishments - as a parent, I would be furious if my son missed his playtime because some of the class were misbehaving.
    High expectations, house points (they will still do anything for house points), targeted praise, ensuring they know what they are doing, understanding and sticking to the school's behaviour policy, keeping track of good and bad behaviour and ensuring their teacher will know about it.
    At the end of the day, they are still children (honest) and you are the adult. You have the power and the authority and they need to know that - take no prisoners and show no fear.

     

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