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Unsure about teaching in Further Education or Secondary

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by qmaq26, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. Hello everyone this is my first post so naturally I will have lots to ask you guys. So here goes. I graduated with a degree in Sports studies in 2007. On finishing my degree I was successful in obtaining my first job as a sports development officer. I worked with young people and adults in the community to set up provisions in physical activity and sports. I also worked in local authority and the health service setting up health and wellbeing projects for communities. My experience in all this has led me in to my current post as a community health researcher and Health Education Tutor teaching adults. The organisation I work for is th Workers Education Association (WEA) a national organisation working with adult learners. First of all I was interested in doing the post compulsory education in further education teaching sports. But after reading and researching FE on this site I have my doubts. FE is not what I thought it would be in terms of the job prospects. I was wondering if their are any FE lecturers who can give me an insight in to FE and how stable it is and if it's a good idea to go in too? I was so committed to teaching in FE that I also completed the PTTLS course but now I think this was a pointless task. I have also thought about the PGCE secondary teaching in PE. However this seems very competive and obtaining a job at the end of it seems very bleak. Although I have experience working in schools coaching sports and worked as a youth worker for a year and a half but I do not have any experience teaching in school. Will this be a disadvantage to me or with the experience I have working with young people in a non education setting help my chances? Failing that the other option I have at my disposal is teaching a shortage subject such as RE. I have a postgraduate certificate in Religious Studies so this entitles me to progress on to a PGCE in RE without having a degree in RE. Can someone please tell me if RE is still a shortage subject and in demand? What are the job prospects like after completing a PGCE? And also if I took the RE route can I still teach PE as a second subject or even apply for PE teaching posts in secondary and further education. I really passionate about both subjects as I feel I have a good understanding of both subjects. I would really appreciate getting some expert advice and putting me in the right direction. Thanks.
     
  2. Hello everyone this is my first post so naturally I will have lots to ask you guys. So here goes. I graduated with a degree in Sports studies in 2007. On finishing my degree I was successful in obtaining my first job as a sports development officer. I worked with young people and adults in the community to set up provisions in physical activity and sports. I also worked in local authority and the health service setting up health and wellbeing projects for communities. My experience in all this has led me in to my current post as a community health researcher and Health Education Tutor teaching adults. The organisation I work for is th Workers Education Association (WEA) a national organisation working with adult learners. First of all I was interested in doing the post compulsory education in further education teaching sports. But after reading and researching FE on this site I have my doubts. FE is not what I thought it would be in terms of the job prospects. I was wondering if their are any FE lecturers who can give me an insight in to FE and how stable it is and if it's a good idea to go in too? I was so committed to teaching in FE that I also completed the PTTLS course but now I think this was a pointless task. I have also thought about the PGCE secondary teaching in PE. However this seems very competive and obtaining a job at the end of it seems very bleak. Although I have experience working in schools coaching sports and worked as a youth worker for a year and a half but I do not have any experience teaching in school. Will this be a disadvantage to me or with the experience I have working with young people in a non education setting help my chances? Failing that the other option I have at my disposal is teaching a shortage subject such as RE. I have a postgraduate certificate in Religious Studies so this entitles me to progress on to a PGCE in RE without having a degree in RE. Can someone please tell me if RE is still a shortage subject and in demand? What are the job prospects like after completing a PGCE? And also if I took the RE route can I still teach PE as a second subject or even apply for PE teaching posts in secondary and further education. I really passionate about both subjects as I feel I have a good understanding of both subjects. I would really appreciate getting some expert advice and putting me in the right direction. Thanks.
     
  3. skintbint

    skintbint New commenter

    wow- sports and faith? there's a real Chariots of Fire theme going on here - lol!
    I teach maths in a college and part of it include teaching on the Access to Sports course, which I admit I love doing. There are vacancies in this area, but new jobs tend to be hourly paid and you have to pay your dues - sometimes for a few years unless you are v lucky.
    I also taught in a girls school which was a hideous experience! However if you feel you have the right temperament I think jobs in this sector are easier to come by, and pay and prospects are a bit better too.
     
  4. Unfortunately RE as a GCSE subject in schools is now on the ropes due to it not counting as a humanities subject for the EBacc. This year schools that had been planning to recruit RE teachers instead used the money to appoint History and Geography teachers as these are the two humanites subjects for the EBacc. Expect that when redudancies are made in humanities area it will be the RE teachers who will go. Legally schools are obliged to teach RE, but as it won't count for the EBacc many schools are cutting it to the minimum they can get away with or combining it with other subjects.
     
  5. Thanks for the reply guys. Well RE AND SPORTS is a unique combination. I thought it will give me a better chance as I can offer both subjects. So skintbint are you saying I should try the PE secondary route as it's a better prospect. If I go the FE route i will not be able to teach in secondary but I can do with QTS status. I was quite keen on the RE PGCE but seems like the future of RE does not look good.
     
  6. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    Hi qmaq26.Welcome to the TES forum and welcome to the profession, if you finally make it! Hope you do because you sound pretty enthusiastic about it. Make sure you post this question in both RE and secondary forums.
    Firstly a warning. You have had a bit of experience of life so you won't need me to tell you to be careful of places like this forum. Some of the dreadful, ignorant and unpleasant, comments and opinions from so called teachers quite get me down, and I'm sure they paint the teaching profession in a very poor light as being a bunch of unpleasant moaners. I quickly add, not so much here, but over in the dreadful "opinions" string.
    However, that said, I think a lot of the chat here stems from their (I say "their", because I retired last year) passion and commitment to the job, mixed with frustration over the control they don't have to put things right as they see it.
    I worked in secondary (20 yrs), followed by a university (5yrs), and ending up in FE (5yrs), thoroughly enjoying all of them, even though they were all tough in their own ways. Certainly the people I worked with, (with one or two exceptions of course!) were delightful to associate with.
    To find out what jobs there are out there, look regularly at the LEAs and others teaching jobs websites. Sign up for the TES and others job e-mails to get sent vacancies from them. Different parts of the country have different shortage subjects and requirements.
    I mainly taught science, but worked with the PE department in several areas and it was great fun. As you probably realise, sports and physical activities are some of the more appropriate things to teach children, making it much more pleasant than some other subjects. RE is somewhere near the other end of the spectrum! I remember one of my RE colleagues remarking on the "baggage" that the students bring into the classroom.
    However, this was not always so. For a brief time in the 70's and 80's teaching was expected to be child centred and the school I taught at did not teach "RE" as such, but "philosophy" instead. (Which as far as I can tell, is the useful bit that comes out of RE.) This was much more accepted by the students. Incidentally this was a Roman Catholic Church assisted school, and the teachers were present, and ex, Priests, Monks and Nuns. It was a fabulous place to work at the time! It was when they had to call the subject RE and work with the older notions of what it is that the problems started. (I think I digress!)
    Anyway, I can only give you my opinion and that is to get qualified to teach PE in secondary. It is much easier to move from secondary to FE than the other way around, there are more jobs and the pay is about 10 or 20% better!
    I have more to say on the subject, but I've got to make lunch now! Cheers.
     
  7. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    This string reminded me of one of my favourite teachers, Mr. Rogers, way back in 1964/65. He had been head of a missionary school in Africa and had come back to the UK.
    He only had one arm, but with a massive hand on the end of it. He took us for rugby as well as RE and I remember the first time I saw him catch a rugby ball simply by reaching up to a high kick and snatching the ball out of the air with one hand. The ball simply stopped in his hand as though it had glue! Marvellous!
    We decided that he had had his arm bitten off by a crocodile! And what did we call him? Jolly Rogers, the One Armed Bandit!
    Long shot I know, but anybody here also went to George Abbott School, Guildford, in the mid 60's and remembers Mr. Rogers?
     
  8. skintbint

    skintbint New commenter

    If you can offer both subjects that would of course be ideal, you could aim for a job in faith school, these are always extremely popular even when organised religion isn't - ironic...or in an independent school where teachers who can offer extra-curricular subjects are highly sought after.
     
  9. Word of warning about Philosophy at A level, its not on the Russell Groups list of recommended A level subjects, so you may you see student numbers going down, this appears to be happening to sociology and psychology.
     

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