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Unsatisfactory lesson obs - progress made by pupils

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by bevtee, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. Just beginning to feel confident about being a competent (satisfactory to good) classroom teacher and had an observation yesterday. Hints that it would be rated 'unsatisfactory' because the pupils did not make progress. Would like to see a good or outstanding lesson plan that allows me to measure this successfully without turning my teaching style, and personality, into that of a cyborg. Do I test at the beginning in the starter, do 10-15 mins of teaching then let the pupils to 'develop', then test again at the end. My W.I.L.F's are differentiated by level and when I checked the learning (work) done by the kids they had achieved in line with their W.I.L.F's. Feel cheated and agrieved because the lesson contained a guided group, all of whom achieved level 7 despite being targeted 6b the highest and this was 'excellently' run and orchestrated, 'good' plenary, excellent APP and marking. Please send a lesson plan or system to help me feel less like applying to clean the school rather than teaching in it!
     
  2. Just beginning to feel confident about being a competent (satisfactory to good) classroom teacher and had an observation yesterday. Hints that it would be rated 'unsatisfactory' because the pupils did not make progress. Would like to see a good or outstanding lesson plan that allows me to measure this successfully without turning my teaching style, and personality, into that of a cyborg. Do I test at the beginning in the starter, do 10-15 mins of teaching then let the pupils to 'develop', then test again at the end. My W.I.L.F's are differentiated by level and when I checked the learning (work) done by the kids they had achieved in line with their W.I.L.F's. Feel cheated and agrieved because the lesson contained a guided group, all of whom achieved level 7 despite being targeted 6b the highest and this was 'excellently' run and orchestrated, 'good' plenary, excellent APP and marking. Please send a lesson plan or system to help me feel less like applying to clean the school rather than teaching in it!
     
  3. The way that our school advises us to show progress in a lesson is to have differentiated outcomes that are shared at the start of the lesson, and then as you progress through the lesson you can review the outcome that you have just completed or are working towards and we tick them off on the board. This shows anyone that walks in at any point that outcomes are being met and that progress is being made. At first it felt artifical but now is second nature.
    Hope that helps
     
  4. Thanks for the speedy reply. The ticking off is a great tip. Thought I had covered the reviewing of outcomes with revisiting them before the leaning task began and as we were going through the plenary and using the trafic light system to check confidence and understanding. If I had whistles and bells ... All the above were suggested in my last obs and I thought by covering them at least I would improve on that but it seems that there will always be something else expected that has not been shared. I am going to ask to be observed again once I get the actual feedback and will use the ticking off, in the positive sense.

    Bev
     
  5. Vampyria

    Vampyria New commenter

    Make sure as well during the feedback that you argue your case as it were and put your points forward as to why you disagree with the grade.
    Just out of interest was this a different observer this time?
     
  6. ianj6

    ianj6 New commenter

    Also have level descriptors on the screen after the Objectives, then refer to these though out the lesson but speciffically at the end.
    It is difficult and it is entirey possible to have goods and outstandings in every criteria, but if the "progression of learning" box is unsatisafactory then the lesson has to be that. It is a bitter pill to swallow, it's happened to me, well done for coming out fighting, rather than curling up in a ball.
    As was said earlier, it feels really wierd at first doing all this stuff, but it does become natural. I was concerned about how long it would take to put in all the stuff they wanted to get us to do at the start of the lesson, but I got observed and it took 3 mins to start learning.

    A good idea, may be to get someone from another Fac to observe you, it eases the pressure and also they can see things that a subject specialist won't. I'm an MFL teacher, but some of my most useful obs have come from an AST Maths Teacher, and a Science Teacher. It's strange in taeching that we won't have conversations about Learning.
     
  7. Same observer - head of English but seemingly elastic goal posts! Have had very positive obs from one of the senior management team who is science trained and someone from the LEA. So maybe CALs are under other pressures from senior manag. teams. Who knows?
     
  8. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Sorry to say this but your schools sound like hell.
     
  9. I would be interested to know why you think this. Do they sound too rigid, too structured in the latest in 'learning'? Let me (us) know how yours operates and encourages pupils to learn etc.

    bevtee
     
  10. we've had this format suggested to us on an external training course as a good way to evidence learning at various points of a lesson and how to impress an Ofsted person who only stays for half a lesson.
    starter building on prior learning relevant to this lesson
    main activity 1
    mini-plenary 1 showing learning from activity 1
    main activity 2
    mini-plenary 2 showing learning from activity 2
    plenary pulling together aspects of main 1 & 2 to show achievement of lesson objective
     
  11. Thank you very much for this suggestion to measure progress. I am going to try everything suggested to please, oh and maybe the pupils will learn something in between times!
    Thanks again,
    Bevtee
     
  12. Agreed. These schools want robots, not teachers with a passion for their subject. What a complete overkill on tick-box, form filling, bo ll ox.
    Most of us got results before all this carp was invented.
     
  13. Don't know if you have seen the 'Little Green Ofsted Book' but in it there is a foolproof idea to demonstrate progress in learning that I have seen work and given outstanding grades across the board.

    Prepare a large arrow (red is a good colour) and place it in a significant wall space/board in your room. Should be at least for foot across. On the left of the arrow write something like 'I know and understand nothing about this subject' In the middle write 'I know and understand something' and at the end write 'I could give an informed opinion'. Have prepared 3 different colours of post its for each pupil which they write their name on. Before the starter, introduce the lesson using a word you are quite sure they will not know. Ask pupils to place their first post it along the arrow, depending on what they think they know about the lesson subject. Then as the lesson progresses, ask the pupils to place their post it notes that should now clearly show progress, as your learning objectives address the key word/lesson outcome.
    At the end of the lesson, you will be able to demonstrate to any observer that your class have made progress...in fact you are sticking this fact in their faces!!! Three different colours of post its that show progression from total ignorance to higher levels of understanding.

    Hope this helps!
     
  14. asnac

    asnac Established commenter

    You might want to PM your advice as I doubt the OP is watching this topic any more.
     
  15. I wonder how much time will be taken up with 30 children getting up to stick their post-its on the arrow!
     
  16. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    I really, really wished that was a parody or a subtle mickey-take. How deeply, deeply stupid. What has gone wrong with the teaching profession?
     
  17. What utter turd.
     
  18. What strikes me as counter productive, is this sense of having to 'demonstrate' to said inspector what progress is being made. I want all my teaching to be good, and to teach as best as I can (also to survive of course). If I am having to demonstrate the learning through various fairly ridiculous gimmicks in an observation, i am not teaching like I normally would. I know we will put on a bit of a show for an observation, but is death by postits really necessary?

    Of course to have the kids conducting themselves in the observed lesson in a normal way, so showing that this is what always happens, we have to also use these gimmicks throughout our teaching. Thus we are demonstrating the learning to iinspectors who are not there! What a waste of time.
     
  19. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    I have a year 11 child in the midst of preparation for GCSEs.

    They've just got a new (experienced) science teacher who is apparently wasting around a quarter of each and every lesson with this sort of utter nonsense.

    I know complaining is going to be difficult - the "head of performance" at the school will no doubt support this **** as he's been told on his training courses that continually demonstrating progress is exactly what Ofsted want (it isn't!) and no doubt thinks it's the way to exam success too.

    It angers and depresses me that this rubbish is ruining the chances of so many kids. The fact that one of those kids is mine makes me bl**dy furious!
     
  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    The profession has been under gradual erosion for years since the
    introduction of Ofsted inspectors. Many other posters will say results
    were achieved before Ofsted were even thought of and this is true. Sorry
    to say this, but teachers themselves have played a part in the current
    situation because of their own complacency and tendency to accept all
    the rubbish heaped on them by various governments, HTs and huge amounts
    of interference and questioning of their professionalism. All accepted
    without question instead of showing solidarity with colleagues placed in
    ridiculous and blatantly unfair positions. Now further erosion will
    take place under performance related pay.
    A microcosm of this
    complacency can be seen in the tiny number of teachers who have signed
    the petition asking the government to live up to its own mandate by
    having qualified teachers in the classroom, instead of the cheap option
    of using unqualified TAs or misemploying teachers as cover supervisors.
    If people cannot even be bothered to add their name to an important
    petition which directly affects all of us, then there really is no hope
    for the profession and we shouldn't complain about the ever-more
    ridiculous targets designed by Ofsted.
    http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/40106

     

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