1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Unsafe students - should we be allowed to exclude them from workshops?

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by tech_hod, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. I have had a problem with the small number of perennially unsafe students in our workshops. One, for example, was regularly unsafe during year 9. He was statemented for behaviour, his statement including the line, "has little or no awareness of risk". He had permanent TA support in class, but this didn't prevent him from deliberately smashing his own work up with a hammer, running out of the classroom, then pelting the window with snowballs whilst being told by his TA, who'd chased him, to stop. One snowball hit a window close to someone who was working on a Hegna saw, making them jump.
    I filled in all the usual paperwork, and suggested to the SLT that he was permanently excluded from the subject. I even filled in a separate risk assessment for him. Within this I proposed he would not be allowed to take D&T in year 10.
    Amazingly, he appeared on my RM lists for year 10. I expressed concern about this, pointing to my risk assessment. I was told that by the Deputy Head that I would have to manage the situation!
    Not suprisingly, he, within two weeks after the start of term, had smashed his work up with a 1 metre steel ruler, which he swung overhead. It narrowly missed his TA's head. I managed to have him removed from RM for 1 week only.
    When he returned, after a good week or so, he started a fight, culminating in him grabbing a sharpened piece of acrylic which he saw nearby, and trying to stab another lad in the neck with it. I had to physically intervene. This time I again appealed for a permanent ban from the subject. The SLT removed him from RM for a week.
    I ended up going off sick - with stress - about the time he returned to RM lessons. He has since then been permamently excluded from the school.
    I feel very let down by my SLT, and having now been off school for about a year - with a break when I did a phased return - am seriously considering jacking in teaching.
    I used to be a project manager in heavy manufacturing industry. In even the most traditional companies, such as mine, if anyone was seen in the factory without the correct PPA on they would be given a verbal warning, then a written one. One more infringement, and they would be sacked. I really feel this sort of regime should be implemented in schools, even for simple things like safety goggles, otherwise a) our young people won't be able to cope with getting a practical job, and b) our teachers will increasingly be squeezed between getting results and 'keeping naughty children busy' when they can't sit still in a desk-based subject.
    Don't getme wrong, I love teaching, and will do anything to help them enrich their lives through extra things like doing the Greenpower electric car racing, and the Toyota Technology Challenge. My lesson observations generally come back as Good, and as HOD I feel I am doing a good job. Results are pretty good. However, this tension between coping with the naughty ones that I'm not allowed to exclude, the needs of the curriculum, and the never-ending pressure of the coloured charts that tell me so-and-so is underperforming by one grade compared to a target based upon their desk-based '3 Rs' work from a few years ago, is getting to me!

     
  2. I have had a problem with the small number of perennially unsafe students in our workshops. One, for example, was regularly unsafe during year 9. He was statemented for behaviour, his statement including the line, "has little or no awareness of risk". He had permanent TA support in class, but this didn't prevent him from deliberately smashing his own work up with a hammer, running out of the classroom, then pelting the window with snowballs whilst being told by his TA, who'd chased him, to stop. One snowball hit a window close to someone who was working on a Hegna saw, making them jump.
    I filled in all the usual paperwork, and suggested to the SLT that he was permanently excluded from the subject. I even filled in a separate risk assessment for him. Within this I proposed he would not be allowed to take D&T in year 10.
    Amazingly, he appeared on my RM lists for year 10. I expressed concern about this, pointing to my risk assessment. I was told that by the Deputy Head that I would have to manage the situation!
    Not suprisingly, he, within two weeks after the start of term, had smashed his work up with a 1 metre steel ruler, which he swung overhead. It narrowly missed his TA's head. I managed to have him removed from RM for 1 week only.
    When he returned, after a good week or so, he started a fight, culminating in him grabbing a sharpened piece of acrylic which he saw nearby, and trying to stab another lad in the neck with it. I had to physically intervene. This time I again appealed for a permanent ban from the subject. The SLT removed him from RM for a week.
    I ended up going off sick - with stress - about the time he returned to RM lessons. He has since then been permamently excluded from the school.
    I feel very let down by my SLT, and having now been off school for about a year - with a break when I did a phased return - am seriously considering jacking in teaching.
    I used to be a project manager in heavy manufacturing industry. In even the most traditional companies, such as mine, if anyone was seen in the factory without the correct PPA on they would be given a verbal warning, then a written one. One more infringement, and they would be sacked. I really feel this sort of regime should be implemented in schools, even for simple things like safety goggles, otherwise a) our young people won't be able to cope with getting a practical job, and b) our teachers will increasingly be squeezed between getting results and 'keeping naughty children busy' when they can't sit still in a desk-based subject.
    Don't getme wrong, I love teaching, and will do anything to help them enrich their lives through extra things like doing the Greenpower electric car racing, and the Toyota Technology Challenge. My lesson observations generally come back as Good, and as HOD I feel I am doing a good job. Results are pretty good. However, this tension between coping with the naughty ones that I'm not allowed to exclude, the needs of the curriculum, and the never-ending pressure of the coloured charts that tell me so-and-so is underperforming by one grade compared to a target based upon their desk-based '3 Rs' work from a few years ago, is getting to me!

     
  3. I have been told that Health & Safety is the last resort for this type of child. Fill in the DATA Risk Assessment Form which includes sections on behaviour and problem students. One for the whole group and then individually for the riskier students. Submit them to your HOD, Child Safety Officer, Head Teacher etc... Make them aware that THEY will be personally responsible for anything that goes wrong!
     
  4. I've added a copy of my RA spreadsheet to my resources.
     
  5. If you give your line manager all the information along with your professional opinion they are responsible for the safety of the pupils, you and the equipment. If you are a member of D&TA they will provide lots of backup info that reads very well with all the right legal jargon etc.
    Otherwise I would suggest the union?
    Makes me feel very lucky that we have a supportive SMT that will allow us to 'internally exclude' pupils from practical if we can prove that they have not done the design/folder work to support their projects. Not too difficult as they do little of anything useful. They have to sit while the rest work and if they kick off get removed by On Call. Very lucky, may be I won;t change schools just yet.
     
  6. Having just seen your question & read the details - Its an emphatic NO to you having to deal with these pupils in your lessons - they are a danger & should be withdrawn from the lessons on a permenant basis as it is against Health & Safety Regulations - I would raise the issue again with your head of facultyand pout it in writing to both him/her, SLT & the Head teacher because this is then their problem if there should be a problem - your HOF should be aware of thisif H&S training has been done.
     

Share This Page